Streams

 

Americans With Disabilities Act

WNYC News

A Challenge to Developers: Software to Help People with Disabilities

Wednesday, April 08, 2015

How can tablets and smartphones benefit people who have a hard time moving around?

Comment

WNYC News

Disabled New Yorkers Sue for Safer Streets

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

WNYC

New York City is being sued for violating the federal Americans with Disabilities Act, which celebrated its 24th anniversary last week. Advocates argue too many city sidewalks lack proper curb cuts and are not accessible to people with disabilities.

Comments [2]

WNYC News

Judge: "City Does Not Have an Adequate Plan" for Evacuating Vulnerable During Disasters

Thursday, November 07, 2013

A federal judge has ruled that New York City is not adequately prepared to evacuate disabled residents during emergencies, a problem that came to the forefront during Sandy and Irene.

Comments [5]

WNYC News

1 in 10 New Yorkers Might Be at Risk in Case of Evacuation

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

WNYC

Think we learned something from all those Sandy stories of disabled people trapped in high-rises struggling to survive? Think again.

Disability rights groups are suing New York City in Federal Court saying the city's emergency plans are discriminatory and violate federal laws. A ruling could come any day now.

Comments [5]

Transportation Nation

Court Rules NYC Taxis Need Not Be Wheelchair Accessible

Thursday, June 28, 2012

(New York, NY - WNYC) A federal appeals court has struck down a ruling that would have required New York City to give taxi licenses only to wheelchair-accessible vehicles.

The Second U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the Americans with Disabilities Act doesn't require the city to demand that cabbies serve the disabled, only that the city not discriminate against disabled people seeking a license to drive a cab. That's despite the fact that only 2 percent of the city's yellow taxis are wheelchair-accessible.

See the court's decision here.

The city can keep moving toward a contract with Nissan to provide New York with a "Taxi of Tomorrow": a mini-van with transparent roofs, USB chargers and extra legroom--but no easy access to people in wheelchairs.

Mayor Bloomberg praised the decision to let the new cab project move forward. “This ruling is consistent with common sense and the practical needs of both the taxi industry and the disabled, and we will continue our efforts to assist disabled riders,” he said.

Assuming Nissan signs a contract with the city, it will become the sole provider of New York's yellow taxis. The new models would be rolled out beginning next year, as older cabs are retired.

But the Taxis for All Campaign decried the ruling in a statement: "New York City has more taxis than any city in America. Yet only 232 (1.8%) out of 13,237 taxis are accessible to people who use wheelchairs. Because subway stations are also inaccessible, the lack of accessible taxis has left wheelchair users with no viable way to travel in New York City."

The lower court ruling had called access to wheelchair-friendly cabs "a basic civil right." Disability Rights Advocates’ attorney Sid Wolinsky, who represented some plaintiffs in the case, blasted the city for not delivering on that right. “The Bloomberg administration has been astonishingly hostile to people with disabilities," he said. “The notion that New York City would now have a taxi fleet that is mostly not accessible when cities like London have had a 100 percent accessible fleet for over a decade is pretty shameful.”

Wolinsky believes his group could still win the case through other arguments that weren't addressed by the appeals court.

Edith Prentiss of the Taxis For All Campaign agreed. “This ruling will not stop us," she said. "We have been fighting for the rights of persons with disabilities to use this public transportation system for a decade, and the fight will continue."

Read More

Comment

WNYC News

Disabled Residents Plead Their Case To Get More Accessible Cabs

Thursday, November 03, 2011

WNYC

A meeting among taxi industry stakeholders is taking place at the Governor's office on Friday, as he considers whether to sign the Bloomberg administration's 5 Borough Taxi Plan. Disabled New Yorkers say they're optimistic that in the process Governor Andrew Cuomo will help make the city's taxi fleet more accessible.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Laughing at Disability: Remembering Cartoonist John Callahan

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

In the same week we celebrated the 20th year anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act I learned that writer and cartoonist John Callahan passed away. He was a cartoonist who said what other wouldn’t about the experience of disability. His cartoons were hysterically funny. His book “Don’t Worry He Won’t Get Far On Foot,” was both a caption to a drawing that everyone who uses a wheelchair has seen, and a collection of daring explorations of myths and stereotypes. Callahan probably had as much to do with the empowerment of people with disabilities with his universally funny work as the ADA itself.

Read More

Comments [2]