Streams

 

American History

Studio 360

Broadcasting Live From 1914

Thursday, December 25, 2014

This week, Studio 360 travels back in time to 1914, reporting on the cultural landmarks of a remarkable year.

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Studio 360

American Icons: "Migrant Mother"

Friday, November 14, 2014

Before it became the all-purpose image of hardship, Dorothea Lange’s famous portrait was just one of hundreds she shot to document poverty in the Depression.

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Studio 360

American Icons: The Scarlet Letter

Friday, May 16, 2014

Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel about forbidden love among the Puritans captured our admiration for independence — and our craving for scandal. How much has changed in the 150 years since?  

Bonus Track: Tom Perrotta on Nathaniel Hawthorne's influence 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Benjamin Franklin, who wrote more letters to his sister than he wrote to anyone else, was the original American self-made man; his sister spent her life caring for her 12 children. Historian Jill Lepore shows that Benjamin Franklin’s youngest sister was, like her brother, a passionate reader, a gifted writer, and an astonishingly shrewd political commentator. Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin brings Jane Franklin to life in a way that illuminates not only one woman but an entire world.

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Studio 360

American Icons: The Scarlet Letter

Friday, November 01, 2013

One of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s ancestors was a judge in the Salem witch trials. In his novel of early America, Hawthorne explores the tension between our deeply ingrained Puritanism and our celebration of personal freedom. Hester Prynne was American literature’s first heroine, a fallen woman who’s not ashamed of her sin ...

Bonus Track: Tom Perrotta on Nathaniel Hawthorne's influence

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Jill Lepore on the Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin

Tuesday, October 01, 2013

Benjamin Franklin, who wrote more letters to his sister than he wrote to anyone else, was the original American self-made man; his sister spent her life caring for her 12 children. Historian Jill Lepore shows that Benjamin Franklin’s youngest sister was, like her brother, a passionate reader, a gifted writer, and an astonishingly shrewd political commentator. Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin brings Jane Franklin to life in a way that illuminates not only one woman but an entire world.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

"I Have A Dream" 50 Years Later

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Taylor Branch, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and author of The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement (Simon & Schuster), joins us to look back on the 50 years of civil rights history since the March on Washington.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Confidence, Crisis, and Compromise in America: 1848-1877

Wednesday, August 07, 2013

Brenda Wineapple looks at one of the most dramatic and momentous chapters in America's past, when the country dreamed of expansion and new freedom, and was bitterly divided over its great moral wrong: slavery. Ecstatic Nation: Confidence, Crisis, and Compromise, 1848-1877 includes extraordinary characters, such as P. T. Barnum, Walt Whitman, Frederick Douglass, and L.C Q. Lamar, and brilliantly balances cultural and political history.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Bringing the Enlightenment to America

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Jonathan Lyons describes how Benjamin Franklin and his contemporaries brought the Enlightenment to America, and how that intellectual revolution laid the foundation for the political one that followed. In The Society for Useful Knowledge, Lyons tells the story of America's coming-of-age through practical invention, applied science, and self-reliance and how that still influences American society and culture today.

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Untold History of the United States

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Director Oliver Stone and historian Peter Kuznick discuss the Showtime documentary series and the companion book The Untold History of the United States, which challenge the traditional history books in a thoroughly researched and rigorously analyzed look at the dark side of American history in their account of the rise and decline of the American empire.

The 10-part series Oliver Stone's Untold History of the United States airs every Monday night at 8pm on Showtime.

 

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Gore Vidal's Historical Novel 'Julian' and Its Modern Parallels

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

WNYC

"I can talk for an hour without notes, but for 15 minutes, I have to read it. I shall look up occasionally to give an air of spontaneity." Thus, Gore Vidal begins one of his customarily suave and witty speeches, this one delivered at a Books and Authors Luncheon held on November 30, 1964.

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The Takeaway

New Discovery Complicates America's Migrant History

Friday, July 13, 2012

The migratory history of North America has been dominated by the idea of a single, massive wave of migrants traveling from Asia to North America. But a recent report casts doubts upon this theory and suggests that there were at least three migratory crossings that laid the foundations of the New World.

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The Takeaway

George Washington's Defense of Religious Freedom

Wednesday, July 04, 2012

The document that marks our Independence Day is, of course, the Declaration of Independence. But there’s another document worth looking at today, written by another founding father, that tells a story not just of liberty, but of religious tolerance.

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The Takeaway

The National Anthem, Remixed

Wednesday, July 04, 2012

The national anthem commemorates the struggle of our nascent country at war. The lyrics come from a poem Francis Scott Key penned 200 years ago during the War of 1812: "The Defence of Fort McHenry." But does the song reflect the country today, centuries later?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

4th of July History Lesson... and Quiz!

Tuesday, July 03, 2012

Just in time for the 4th of July, catch up on your American history with Kenneth C. Davis, author of the "Don't Know Much About" series, including the anniversary edition of Don't Know Much About History.

Listeners: Call in to put your American-history knowledge to the test in our 4th of July quiz! Call us at 212-433-9692.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How Our Words Unite, Divide, and Define Us

Friday, June 15, 2012

Stephen Prothero talks about putting together The American Bible: How Our Words Unite, Divide, and Define a Nation, an exploration of texts that unite, divide, and define Americans today. He includes works such as Thomas Paine's Common Sense, Maya Lin's Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Twain’s Huck Finn, the speeches of Presidents Lincoln, Kennedy, and Reagan, and the novels of Harriet Beecher Stowe and Ayn Rand.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Paul Ingrassia Tells a History of the American Dream in Fifteen Cars

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Paul Ingrassia tells the story America’s vehicular history—from the assembly lines of Henry Ford to the open roads of Route 66, from the lore of Jack Kerouac to the sex appeal of the Hot Rod. In Engines of Change: A History of the American Dream in Fifteen Cars, Ingrassia explores how cars have both propelled and reflected the American experience.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

March's Book: The Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition, by Daniel Okrent

Tuesday, March 06, 2012

Daniel Okrent, former Public Editor for the New York Times, examines how and why we came to outlaw alcohol in this country, what life under Prohibition was like, and how it changed the country forever. In Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition , he shows how diverse forces came together to bring about Prohibition: the growing political power of the women’s suffrage movement, which allied itself with the antiliquor campaign; the fear of small-town Protestants that they were losing control of their country to the immigrants in the cities; the anti-German sentiment stoked by World War I; and a variety of other factors, ranging from the rise of the automobile to the advent of the income tax.

Pick up a copy and start reading! Daniel Okrent will be here on March 6 to talk about the book. Leave your questions and comments below to join the conversation!

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The Takeaway

Electoral Demographics and a History of Presidential Primaries

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

In a recent op-ed for The New York Times, writer Timothy Egan makes this observation about the voters turning out for GOP primary contests around the country: "There is no other way to put this without resorting to demographic bluntness: the small fraction of Americans who are trying to pick the Republican nominee are old, white, uniformly Christian and unrepresentative of the nation at large." He goes on to make this observation about the demographic of the Republican primary electorate: "They are much closer to the population of 1890 than of 2012."

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The Takeaway

New Study Shows Growing Rate and Acceptance of Interracial Marriage

Friday, February 17, 2012

In 1958, Mildred and Richard Loving were arrested in their own home, in the middle of the night, for the crime of miscegenation. When the Supreme Court declared miscegenation laws illegal in 1967, 16 states still had such laws on the books. A new poll released this week by the Pew Research Center shows just how far we’ve come in the five decades since the Lovings’ arrest. 15 percent of new marriages in 2010 crossed racial or ethnic lines, double the rate from 1980. And a great majority of Americans say they would readily accept an interracial marriage in their family.

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