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Alzheimers

The Takeaway

Love, Sex and Alzheimer's: The Question of Consent

Friday, April 24, 2015

An Iowa man this week was found not guilty of sexually abusing his wife, whom nursing home staff members said was cognitively unable to give consent. How are these cases to be handled?

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The Takeaway

Scientists Close In on Alzheimer's Cure

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Researchers at Duke University blocked the progression of memory loss in mice, and they hope to do the same for humans. 

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The Takeaway

Film Chronicles Glen Campbell's Alzheimer's Encore

Thursday, October 23, 2014

In 2011, before his "Farewell Tour," Glen Campbell was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. At the time, he agreed to let filmmaker James Keach document the effects of his illness.

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The Takeaway

Parents Can Now Choose to Have a Child Without Alzheimer's

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Under a new procedure, doctors can prevent a woman with a family history of early onset Alzheimer's from passing on to her child any chromosomes that carry the disease.

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The Takeaway

Combating Alzheimer's With Music

Monday, July 21, 2014

Who do we become when we can no longer remember our own pasts? Could something as simple as music be a saving grace for the more than 5 million Americans suffering from Alzheimer's? 

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The Takeaway

Alzheimer's Through One Family's Eyes

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

According to the Alzheimer's Association, in 2014 an estimated 5.2 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease. A new film called "A Short History of Decay" explores what the disease can teach us about end of life challenges.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Pilgrimage Through Alzheimer's

Friday, September 06, 2013

Poet Jeanne Murray Walker talks about her mother's long passage into dementia. In The Geography of Memory explores parental love, grief, and the unexpected consolation of memory. Her mother's memory, which more and more dwells in the distant past, illuminates Walker's own childhood, and helps her rediscover and understand her own past.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Alzheimer's Disease and New Alzheimer's Research

Friday, June 21, 2013

Dr. Jerome Groopman, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Chief of Experimental Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and staff writer for The New Yorker, explains new approaches to Alzheimer’s research for this week’s Please Explain. Three decades of Alzheimer’s research has brought few results in changing the course of the disease, and there have been few developments in drugs to reverse or slow cognitive decline. In his latest article, “Before Night Falls,” in the June 24 issue of The New Yorker, he looks at the potential of new studies.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Gardening Questions; Florida's Dark Side; "Cornelius" on Stage; Please Explain

Friday, June 21, 2013

Gerard Lordahl, the Greening Director of GrowNYC, answers all your questions about summer gardening! Then T. D. Allman looks at how the state of Florida went from being a swampy backwater to the nation’s fourth most populous state, which is playing a key role in 21st century America. Alan Cox and Emily Barber talk about “Cornelius,” a long forgotten play by J.B. Priestely, one of Britain’s greatest dramatists. Our latest Please Explain is about new insights into Alzheimer’s disease.

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The Takeaway

Is It Worth Knowing Alzheimer's is Coming if There's Nothing You Can Do About It?

Thursday, August 19, 2010

We're following a new development about research into Alzheimer's treatment and prevention. On Tuesday, drug manufacturer Eli Lilly stopped two late-stage clinical trials of a treatment after researchers found an experimental drug was actually making Alzheimer’s symptoms worse. The news is just one more setback in a long series of setbacks for attempts to cure or prevent the deadly disease. 

However, there was some good news recently: determining who will get Alzheimer's. Researchers reported a few weeks ago that a spinal test can predict — with 100 percent accuracy — whether people who are experiencing severe memory loss will get the disease. However, there is nothing medically that can be done, even if you know it's coming.

We’re asking, is it better to know if you're going to get Alzheimer's, or is it easier to stay in the dark? Do you have a relative with Alzheimer's? What would you have done differently if you'd had known it was coming?

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