Streams

 

Alzheimer'S

On Being

Alan Dienstag — Alzheimer's and the Spiritual Terrain of Memory [remix]

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Alzheimer's disease has been described as "the great unlearning." But what does it reveal about the nature of human identity? What remains when memory unravels?

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On Being

[Unedited] Alan Dienstag with Krista Tippett

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Alzheimer's disease has been described as "the great unlearning." But what does it reveal about the nature of human identity? What remains when memory unravels?

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Storytelling with The Moth; "A Teacher"; Living with Alzheimer's; Please Explain

Friday, September 06, 2013

Since it started in 1997, The Moth has presented thousands of stories. We’ll talk to founder George Dawes Green, artistic director Catherine Burns, and contributor Dr. George Lombardi about the art of telling stories. We'll talk to the director of the new movie "A Teacher." Poet Jeanne Murray talks about her mother’s long decline into dementia. Plus, this week’s Please Explain!

The Takeaway

The Heart Over the Head: A Revolutionary Approach to Dementia Care

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Over the decades, those who treat people with dementia have tried a number of methods of care to deal with symptoms, from physical exercise to drug therapy. Tena Alonzo, director of education and research at Beatitudes Campus in Phoenix, Arizona is pioneering a more revolutionary approach. As part of our week-long series on caregiving, Alonzo shares how her emotional approach to dementia care is changing lives for patients.

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The Takeaway

When Caregiving Becomes Everything: How One Family Copes With the Long-Term Care of a Mother with Alzheimer's

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Throughout the week, we're talking with caregivers—people who give much of their time and energy to caring for children, parents and other loved ones who need regular and ongoing assistance. In some cases, this caregiving can last weeks or months. In others, it can last well-over a decade. Such has been the experience of Bernice Osborne-Pollard, long-term caregiver to her mother Mary who suffers from Alzheimer's disease. Bernice shares her story of love, caring, frustration, and overwhelming sacrifice.

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The Takeaway

Study Finds Black and White Alzheimer's Patients Share Gene Variants

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

In one of the largest studies ever done on Alzheimer’s in African-Americans, researchers discovered that the gene variants associated with Alzheimer in people of European ancestry was the same as the one seen in African-American Alzheimer's patients.

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Radiolab

Mapping the Bilingual Brain

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Chris Berube -- intrepid Radiolab intern, and monolinguist -- sets aside his ego to delve into a listener's question about intelligence and speaking more than one language.

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Radiolab

Krulwich Wonders: A Metaphor For Forgetting (That You Might Remember)

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

NPR

Alzheimer's is the disease that creeps in and slowly erases what you know until, eventually, there's no more to erase. How this happens is still a mystery, but this short animation by Po Chou Chi tries to make poetic sense of what goes on.

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Soundcheck

Treating Dementia with Music

Thursday, April 19, 2012

The new documentary "Alive Inside" chronicles the work of social worker Dan Cohen - whose organization, Music & Memory, aims to bring personalized digital music into the lives of the elderly and infirm. Joining us to discuss the role that music can play in elder care - particularly in the lives of dementia patients - is Dan Cohen, as well as Ann Wyatt, Residential Care Policy & Strategy Consultant for the Alzheimer's Association. 

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The Takeaway

Legendary Basketball Pat Summitt Coach Diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Pat Summitt has had a successful career, leading the University of Tennessee’s Lady Vols to eight NCAA championships. Yesterday, the 59-year-old legendary coach announced that she has been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. WNBA player Tamika Catchings played for Coach Summitt at the University of Tennessee for four years. She said she was shocked by the news, but, she explained, "When you think about all of the things Pat’s been able to accomplish, a lot of it has come from her determination and she’s had so many trials and tribulations throughout her life, but look at her. You know, she’s still standing strong." Despite her fighting spirit, Summitt's diagnosis raises questions about Alzheimer's disease, particularly because Summitt is younger than most who suffer from Alzheimer's.

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The Takeaway

Caring for Loved Ones with Alzheimer's

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

One in eight people over age 65 suffers from Alzheimer's disease. Most patients develop late-onset Alzheimer's. Scientists have found a predisposing genetic risk factor for this type of the disease, and while they have yet to discover a direct genetic link, researchers have isolated the early-onset Alzheimer’s gene. Early-onset Alzheimer's is rare, affecting only five percent of Alzheimer’s patients. But it can strike as early as 30, with devastating consequences for the patient and their families. Many families are unprepared for the difficult decisions caregivers face when their loved ones are diagnosed with early- or late-onset Alzheimer's. 


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The Takeaway

Your Take: New Guidelines on Alzheimer's

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Would you want to know whether or not you'll have Alzheimer's if you had the opportunity? The National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association released new guidelines on the disease, in order to diagnose it earlier in its nascent stages as well as encourage more drug development. Readers and Takeaway listeners shared their own stories about the disease, worrying about the problems associated with early diagnosis. I don't think I would want to know. I sure as hell wouldn't want the insurance companies to know. Early screening and diagnosis sounds like a great way for insurance companies to expand the field of 'pre-existing conditions,'" writes Takeaway listener, Miriam, from Westwood, NJ.

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The Takeaway

New Guidelines on Alzheimer's Will Help Doctors and Patients

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

The National Institute on Aging is releasing new national guidelines to help catch signs of Alzheimer's. Dr. Creighton Phelps, director of the Alzheimer's Disese Centers Program at the National Institute of Aging explains what this means for patients and their doctors. There are changes that occur in the brain that can be seen with imaging and measuring spinal fluid that are like those in people with Alzheimer's and could potentially help the clinicians know the best way to proceed. This also raises the question: Would you want to know if you were likely to get Alzheimer's?

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The Takeaway

New Guidelines Help Find Alzheimer's Earlier

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Alzheimer's disease affects millions of people worldwide; it's often a disease that is undetectable until it's too late. However, a new set of national guidelines are being released that will help catch signs of the disease earlier. David Shenk, author of "The Forgetting: Alzheimer's, Portrait of an Epidemic," explains the latest guidelines.

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Radiolab

A Bus to Nowhere

Friday, April 01, 2011

There’s a common problem faced by Alzheimer's and Dementia patients all over the world: lost in their memories, they sometimes get disoriented, and wander off. When this happens, they can end up far from home and frightened, or even hurt. So what are you supposed to do if your loved ...

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It's A Free Blog

Taking a Pass on Football for the Next Generation

Monday, February 07, 2011

I love football. And for good reason. My father had no money for college and would not have gone but for track and football scholarships. 

But this is the first year he and I didn’t watch the Super Bowl together. My father now suffers from Parkinson’s disease. I believe — and his doctors do too — that repeated concussions triggered the disease.

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On Being

Alan Dienstag — Alzheimer's, Memory, and Being [remix]

Thursday, April 22, 2010

Alzheimer's disease has been described as "the great unlearning," a "disease of memory," a "demise of consciousness." But what does it reveal about the nature of human identity? What remains when memory unravels? And how might such insights help Alzheimer

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On Being

[Unedited] David Shenk with Krista Tippett

Thursday, April 22, 2010

Alzheimer's disease has been described as "the great unlearning," a "disease of memory," a "demise of consciousness." But what does it reveal about the nature of human identity? What remains when memory unravels? And how might such insights help Alzheimer

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On Being

[Unedited] Alan Dienstag with Krista Tippett

Thursday, April 22, 2010

Alzheimer's disease has been described as "the great unlearning," a "disease of memory," a "demise of consciousness." But what does it reveal about the nature of human identity? What remains when memory unravels? And how might such insights help Alzheimer

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On Being

[Unedited] Gisela Webb with Krista Tippett

Thursday, April 22, 2010

Alzheimer's disease has been described as "the great unlearning," a "disease of memory," a "demise of consciousness." But what does it reveal about the nature of human identity? What remains when memory unravels? And how might such insights help Alzheimer

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