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Aids

WNYC News

City Recommends AIDS Drugs for Any Person With HIV

Thursday, December 01, 2011

City health officials said Thursday they are recommending that any person living with HIV be offered AIDS drugs as soon as they are diagnosed with the virus, an aggressive move that has been shown to prolong life and stem the spread of the disease.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The World AIDS Day 100

Thursday, December 01, 2011

Regan Hofmann, editor in chief of POZ magazine, talks about the publication's list for World AIDS Day of 100 HIV-positive-related people, and ideas and things they love.

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Radiolab

Patient Zero

Monday, November 14, 2011

We hunt for Patient Zeroes from all over the map.

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The Takeaway

The Origin of AIDS: 60 Years Before the First Documented Case

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

By most accounts, the history of AIDS begins sometime in the late 1970s, before the first official cases were diagnosed in 1981 among a handful of gay men. But a striking new book by Dr. Jacques Pépin, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Sherbrooke in Quebec, upends medical history. In "The Origins of AIDS," Pépin traces the roots of the disease back to 1921 when a handful of bush-meat hunters in Africa may have been the first to be exposed to infected chimpanzee blood.

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The Takeaway

Two Contraceptives Put Users at Greater Risk for HIV Infection

Tuesday, October 04, 2011

A study released on Monday shows that women using two popular hormonal contraceptives put themselves — and their partners — at greater risk for HIV. While this is a problem for all users of these drugs, it is particularly worrying to people in southern and eastern Africa, where these affordable and easily available contraceptives are used in a very high risk environment.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Arthur Ashe at the New York Public Library, 1987

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

WNYC

The largest court in the United States Tennis Association's complex in Flushing Meadows, where the US Open has taken place since 1977, is named after Arthur Ashe, one of tennis's great ambassadors. Today we give you a chance to listen to the late Ashe, in a 1987 installment of WNYC's broadcast of Voices at the New York Public Library, where he spoke about his upcoming book on racism in sports.

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The Takeaway

AIDS Fighting Drugs Could Prevent HIV

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Two new studies released on Wednesday show that taking a daily pill designed to fight AIDS can actually prevent an uninfected person from contracting HIV. Donald G. McNeil, Jr., science and health reporter for The New York Times, wrote about this potentially monumental find in today's paper, and has the latest on the story. 

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The Takeaway

My America: Abraham Verghese

Thursday, July 07, 2011

All week, we’ve been speaking with influential Americans about what patriotism and America means to them as part of our series "My America." Today’s guest is Dr. Abraham Verghese, professor of the theory and practice of medicine at Stanford University Medical School, and best-selling author of "My Own Country: A Doctor's Story" and "Cutting for Stone."

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Fighting With Heart

Monday, June 13, 2011

Writer, playwright, activist, co-founder of GMHC, and founder of Act Up Larry Kramer talks about the Tony-winning revival of his play "The Normal Heart" about the onset of the AIDS crisis, and his activism.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Hope for a Cure?

Thursday, June 02, 2011

30 years after the first case was diagnosed, Tina Rosenberg, writer for New York Magazine, and Jeffrey Laurence, director of the Laboratory for AIDS Virus Research at Weill Cornell Medical College and a senior scientific consultant for AMFAR, talk about the case of a man "cured" of AIDS and the state of AIDS research.

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The Takeaway

30 Years After the Discovery of AIDS

Thursday, June 02, 2011

Thirty years ago this week, Dr. Michael Gottlieb identified a new disease in a paper he wrote for the CDC. Characterized by a severely damaged immune system, and primarily afflicting gay men, the syndrome would come to be known as AIDS. In the years since, over sixty million people — of both genders and all sexual orientations — have died of AIDS. Antiretrovirals have been developed, however there is still no cure.

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It's A Free Blog

Elizabeth Taylor: Lone Star in the Fight Against AIDS

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

WNYC
I remember Elizabeth Taylor most of all, not for the breathiness of her famous voice, but for fact that she lent that voice to a community desperately in need of one in its moment of despair.

-- Jami Floyd, on Elizabeth Taylor's AIDS activism

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The Brian Lehrer Show

World AIDS Day: 25 Years in Newark

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

Faye Zealand and Terry Zealand, co-founders of the AIDS Resource Foundation for Children (ARFC) talk about their work in Newark and what has changed in the 25 years they've been working with homeless children with AIDS.

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Features

'Dead' Celebrities in New York Pull for Children's Lives

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

Twenty nine celebrities including humungo-New York stars like Lady Gaga, Alicia Keys and Swizz Beats are planning their "cyber deaths" on December 1 to raise money for AIDS efforts in Africa and India.

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The Takeaway

Good News in HIV Protection, But More Trials Necessary

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

The International AIDS conference in Vienna is underway and there's excitement about a new study showing that there may be a new effective microbicide to help prevent against HIV infection. Science Magazine correspondent, Jon Cohen is at the conference. He says that the microbicide is not ready for general use and that more trials are needed. He also says that this is part of a combination prevention and that condoms and behavioral change are still necessary.

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The Takeaway

New Hope in Reducing Rate of HIV Infections in Women

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

There's good news in the fight against HIV. A new South African study has found that a microbicide gel containing the antiretroviral medication, Tenofovir can significantly reduce the rate of HIV infections. The study included almost 900 volunteers and showed that the gel cut a woman's chances of being infected by 50 percent after the first year.

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The Takeaway

Recession Impacts Government-Funded Treatments for H.I.V. and AIDS

Thursday, July 01, 2010

Waiting lists for for government-funded life-sustaining antiretroviral drugs for people with H.I.V. and AIDS have ballooned to nearly 1,800 people from zero just three years ago. What's caused this change? Quite simply, the recession.

Diminished government coffers combined with widespread loss of medical insurance due to unemployment has created the perfect storm for a burgeoning public health and budgetary crisis. Louisiana, Florida, Arkansas and Utah are among numerous states that have either closed enrollment or narrowed eligibility in the AIDS Drug Assistance Program. Ten states are no longer covering treatments that do not directly combat H.I.V. or opportunistic infections, and Florida will likely winnow its list of 101 covered medications to 53.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ethical Implications of HIV/AIDS

Monday, June 21, 2010

We continue our five part series AIDS: Then & Now with a look at how ethical issues around the virus have and have not changed over the decades. We’ll talk with  Dr. Robert Klitzman, Director of the Ethics and Policy Core of the HIV Center at Columbia University, about why a number of states have statutes criminalizing HIV transmission and the recent court ruling which upholds the ban on gay men donating blood.

We continue our five part series on HIV/AIDS with a look at how ethical issues around the virus have and have not changed over the decades. We’ll examine why a number of states that have statutes criminalizing HIV transmission and the recent court ruling which upholds the ban on gay men donating blood. Plus, the ethics of disclosure for HIV+ individuals and enduring questions about just who should pay for treatment. We’ll talk with Dr. Robert Klitzman, Director of the Ethics and Policy Core of the HIV Center at Columbia University

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The Leonard Lopate Show

25+ Years of HIV/AIDS Research

Friday, June 18, 2010

In the last quarter century, research into HIV—the virus that causes AIDS—has come a long way, but not far enough. Dr. Jay A. Levy, Director of the Laboratory for Tumor and AIDS Virus Research at the University of California, San Francisco, and Dr. Robert C. Gallo, Director of the Institute of Human Virology and Division of Basic Science at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discuss the historical scientific breakthroughs, what the latest research is finding, and how far we have to go before a vaccine or cure for HIV/AIDS is developed.

 

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The Takeaway

AIDS and the African-American Community

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

In the 1980s, HIV, the virus which causes AIDS, carried a deadly stigma.  The virus was initially thought only to spread among communities which put themselves “at risk.”  AIDS was a “gay” disease, or the killer of “drug addicts” and needle-sharers.  

Yesterday, Dennis deLeon, former New York City Human Rights Commissioner and prominent latino AIDS activist, died in Manhattan at 61 years old from heart failure.  deLeon was one of the first city officials to announce that he was infected with HIV.  The work he and others did to build awareness and education of HIV/AIDS helped reduce the virus' stigma.

Yet in some communities, HIV remains a potent killer.  According to the CDC, African-Americans account for 51 percent of our country's HIV/AIDS cases – while only making up 12 percent of our population.

In an attempt to draw attention to and combat the spread of HIV/AIDS, the National Black Leadership Commission, led by African-American clergy, convened in Detroit yesterday. The conference brings together religious, political and labor leaders in hopes of pushing a Congressional bill that would help tackle the spread of the virus in at-risk communities.

In this conversation we speak with Rev. Horace Sheffield, of New Galilee Baptist Church in Detroit, who spearheaded the conference; along with Dazon Dixon Diallo, the Founder and President of Sister Love, a women’s HIV/AIDS and Reproductive Justice Organization in Atlanta, Georgia.  Together, they discuss some of the structural and social reasons that make the African-American community so vulnerable to infection. 

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