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Aids

The Leonard Lopate Show

Alysia Abbott on her Memoir, Fairyland

Monday, June 10, 2013

Alysia Abbott discusses growing up in San Francisco in the 1970s and 80s with an openly gay father. Her memoir, Fairyland: A Memoir of My Father, reconstructs their life together in a city bustling with gay men in search of liberation—few of whom were raising children. She also writes about how AIDS ravaged their community.

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WNYC News

Early Days of AIDS Epidemic are in New Exhibit

Monday, June 03, 2013

The prejudice, confusion and political struggle that marked the Aids epidemic in New York in the early 80s are the subject of a new exhibit.

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On Being

Marie Howe — The Poetry of Ordinary Time [remix]

Thursday, April 25, 2013

An enchanting hour of poetry drawing on the ways family and religion shape our lives. Marie Howe works and plays with her Catholic upbringing, the universal drama of family, and the ordinary time that sustains us.

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On Being

[Unedited] Marie Howe and Krista Tippett

Thursday, April 25, 2013

An enchanting hour of poetry drawing on the ways family and religion shape our lives. Marie Howe works and plays with her Catholic upbringing, the universal drama of family, and the ordinary time that sustains us.

Comment

The Takeaway

Doctors Say They've 'Cured' A Baby Born with AIDS

Monday, March 04, 2013

A baby has been effectively cured of an infection of the AIDS virus, a disease that has shone itself to be frighteningly resilient in the face of human ingenuity. The virus has apparently been thwarted by a little baby and its doctors in Mississippi.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The HIV "Cure"

Monday, March 04, 2013

A story broke over the weekend about a child born with HIV and then "cured." Kevin Frost, CEO of AmFar, the Foundation for AIDS research, explains the case and what the breakthrough "cure" could mean for the future of HIV/AIDS.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

David Dinkins and Arthur Ashe

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

David Dinkins, former mayor of New York City and professor in the practice of public affairs at Columbia University, remembers his friend Arthur Ashe. And hear Arthur Ashe's call to the Brian Lehrer Show 20 years ago.

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The Takeaway

Dr. Everett Koop, Surgeon General During AIDS Crisis, Dies at 96

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Remember the days of health warnings by the surgeon general? They became a part of the way we thought about and understood health risks. Americans turned to the surgeon general, someone highly regarded as the nation's doctor. It's a position that today doesn't carry much influence, but in the 80s, Dr. C. Everett Koop rose to prominence in that role and became a household name.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Oscar Nominated Documentaries: "How to Survive a Plague"

Thursday, February 14, 2013

The annual series on the best documentary Oscar nominees continues with David France, director of "How To Survive A Plague".

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The Leonard Lopate Show

“How to Survive a Plague”

Monday, September 17, 2012

David France, director of the documentary “How to Survive a Plague,” and Peter Staley, who is featured in the film, tell the story of a group of young AIDS activists who taught themselves science and policy to try to save their own lives, and ended up saving 6 million others. “How to Survive a Plague” opens September 21 at IFC Center.

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The Takeaway

Fighting AIDS from the Pulpit, Beginning With the Pastor Himself

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

The Reverend Tony Lee, the pastor of a predominantly African-American church, is doing something unique to combat the AIDS. Four times a year, on the pulpit, he has himself tested for HIV in front of his entire congregation. 

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The Takeaway

The State of AIDS in America

Monday, July 23, 2012

As AIDS activism has taken a global turn, it is important to ask: What is the current status of AIDS in America?

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The Takeaway

Vito: The Activist and the Film

Thursday, July 19, 2012

When he was a young man in the 1960s, Vito Russo wasn’t that different from a lot of young gay men in America, but there was one difference: While many gay Americans still lived in the closet, Vito was out, proud, and loud. The new documentary "Vito" takes a closer look at his life.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The History of the AIDS Activist Movement

Friday, July 06, 2012

Jim Hubbard, director of the new documentary "United In Anger: A History of ACT UP", talks about his new film and the legacy of the ACT UP (AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power) grassroots movement.

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The Takeaway

The AIDS Memorial Quilt Turns 25

Wednesday, July 04, 2012

The AIDS Memorial Quilt is celebrating its 25th anniversary this summer and serves as a history of America’s battle with AIDS, and parts of it will hang in hundreds of community centers across the country. A large portion of the quilt is currently on display in the National Mall as part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington DC.

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The Takeaway

First Over-the-Counter HIV Test Approved

Wednesday, July 04, 2012

Americans will be able to test to see if they are HIV positive in the comfort of their own homes, thanks to the first over-the-counter FDA-approved test.

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The Takeaway

Ethical Questions Surround New At-Home HIV Test

Thursday, May 17, 2012

This week, a 17-member advisory panel to the Food and Drug Administration voted unanimously to recommend the approval of the first-ever completely in-home HIV test. But Art Caplan, professor of bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, sees some major ethical dilemmas facing this major medical development.

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The Takeaway

Panel Endorses HIV Drug Truvada for FDA Approval

Friday, May 11, 2012

We have known about Truvada for a while. Now, an influential advisory panel of the Food and Drug Administration has endorsed the drug shown to prevent HIV infection in healthy people. It recommended approval of the pill for people at risk of contracting the virus. A final decision is expected next month, but if FDA does approve, it won't be without a degree of controversy. We're joined by Dr. Kenneth Mayer, medical research director at Fenway Health in Boston and a professor at Harvard Medical School.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Gentrification of the Mind

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Sarah Schulman, distinguished professor of Humanities at CUNY, Staten Island and author of The Gentrification of the Mind: Witness to a Lost Imagination, looks back on the AIDS crisis and its effect on her life and the arts and politics of her Lower East Side neighborhood.

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The Takeaway

30 Years of the Fight Against AIDS

Monday, December 05, 2011

30 years ago, the first cases of AIDS were reported in the United States. Since then, more than 25 million people worldwide have died from the disease, and more than 34 million people are currently infected with HIV. Being diagnosed with HIV used to be the equivalent of a death sentence. But over the past few years, anti-viral drugs have become less expensive and more effective in fighting the disease, allowing life to go on for millions.

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