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Ai Weiwei

Studio 360

Will a Chinese “Saturday Night Live” Get Past the Censors?

Thursday, March 05, 2015

China is one of the world’s biggest markets for art and culture, but censors there still have the last word over what people get to see. Is freedom of expression coming?    

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Studio 360

When Will Lego Art Grow Up?

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Lego-based art is suddenly ubiquitous — Ai Weiwei's new installation uses 1.2 million of them. But why is it so visually unimaginative?
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The Brian Lehrer Show

Context and An Exhibit: Ai Weiwei at the Brooklyn Museum

Friday, May 02, 2014

An exhibit of Ai Weiwei's work is up at the Brooklyn Museum. Deborah Solomon, art critic for WNYC, talks about the show, "According to What?" and the artist's work. Evan Osnos, staff writer for The New Yorker, and author of Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China, talks about the artist's message and politics in China.

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WNYC News

Ai Weiwei's Provocative Art, Now in Brooklyn

Friday, April 18, 2014

Is he a great artist, or just a great social activist?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry

Friday, July 27, 2012

Director Alison Klayman discusses her documentary “Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry,” an up-close look at renowned Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei and his ongoing battle with the Chinese government. Ai Weiwei is China's most celebrated contemporary artist, who helped design Beijing’s Bird’s Nest Olympic Stadium, and its most outspoken domestic critic. Against a backdrop of strict censorship, Ai has become a kind of Internet champion, using his blog and Twitter stream to organize, inform, and inspire his followers, becoming an underground hero to millions of Chinese citizens. “Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry” opens July 27 at the Lincoln Plaza Cinemas and IFC Center.

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The Takeaway

Alison Klayman on 'Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry'

Friday, July 27, 2012

A holy man? A god? A danger to society? These words are sometimes used to describe cult leaders or false prophets. But they're also used when referring to the artist Ai Weiwei.

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Gallerina

This Week: Must-See Arts in the City

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

WNYC

It may be chilly, but that doesn't mean there isn't stuff to do. Here's what's happening in New York this week.

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Features

NYC Galleries Show Ai Weiwei's Work while Donations in China Pour In

Monday, November 07, 2011

In New York, two galleries have turned their gaze to the work of the controversial Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. Meanwhile, from his home in Beijing, the artist has received more than $800,000 in donations from supporters.

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Features

Outspoken Chinese Artist Ai Weiwei's 'Zodiac Heads' to be Taken Down

Friday, July 15, 2011

Ai's Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads will be taken down from the fountain in front of the Plaza Hotel on Friday, according to the artist's gallery because it's the end of the exhibit's run in the city. The New York stop was part of a world tour for the Zodiac Heads, which will be installed in Los Angeles next month.

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Gallerina

This Week: Must-See Arts in the City

Thursday, June 30, 2011

WNYC

The New York photographs of an important Chinese artist and critic, the caricatures and paintings of a German-American polymath and lots and lots of mosh pits -- not to mention a 600-lb. squid. It's shaping up to be an interesting arts week in the big, sweaty city. Here's what we've got in the hopper.

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Features

Ai Weiwei Photo Exhibit Opens at the Asia Society

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

An exhibition of 227 black-and-white documentary photos taken by the controversial Chinese artist Ai Weiwei in New York from 1983 to 1993 opened at the Asia Society on Wednesday. The show marks the first such exhibit presented outside China. Click here to see a slideshow.

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The Arts File

Artist Ai Weiwei Released by Chinese Authorities

Friday, June 24, 2011

In this week's Arts File, Kerry Nolan speaks with documentary filmmaker Alison Klayman about the release of Chinese artist and activist Ai Wei Wei.

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Features

Museums, Artists and Activists Relieved at the Release of Ai Weiwei

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

The controversial Chinese artist Ai Weiwei was released on bail on Wednesday after he confessed to tax evasion. The news has come as a relief to many artists, public officials, museums and fans.

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Features

Chinese Artist and Activist Ai Weiwei Released on Bail

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

The controversial Chinese artist Ai Weiwei was released on bail on Wednesday after he confessed to tax evasion. The Chinese State Media news agency reported that the artist's good attitude, willingness to pay his allegedly evaded taxes and poor health were factors in his release. On Thursday at noon, Ai supporters had planned to hold a vigil for the Chinese artist and activist who was detained on April 3 at the Plaza Hotel fountain.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

On Ai Weiwei

Friday, May 06, 2011

Evan Osnos, staff writer for The New Yorker in Beijing, discusses Chinese contemporary artist Ai Weiwei, who has been detained by the Chinese government since  April 3, 2011, and why it matters.

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Talk to Me

Talk to Me: China in Two Acts

Thursday, May 05, 2011

China watchers and writers Ian Buruma, Yan Lianke, Linda Polman, David Rieff, and Zha Jianying spoke at the PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature to discuss human rights in China at the Great Hall at Cooper Union.

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Features

Bloomberg Says Unveiling of Ai Weiwei's 'Zodiac Heads' is 'Bittersweet'

Wednesday, May 04, 2011

Mayor Michael Bloomberg spoke at the opening of Ai Weiwei's "Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads" on Wednesday morning. Under a steady rain, 12 figures from the city's arts community read the words of the detained Chinese artist to protesters, fans and the media.

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Studio 360

The Battle of Dixie & Robbie Robertson

Friday, April 15, 2011

One hundred fifty years after the start of the Civil War, a musical revolution continues to divide America: why are we still fighting over the song “Dixie?” Robbie Robertson tells Kurt Andersen about another revolution — going electric with Dylan.  And Kurt asks a documentary filmmaker about the arrest of the ...

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