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Agriculture

The Brian Lehrer Show

But Who Picks Those Locally Sourced Beets?

Friday, April 18, 2014

Margaret Gray, associate professor of political science at Adelphi University and the author of Labor and the Locavore: The Making of a Comprehensive Food Ethic (University of California Press, 2013), argues that the locavore movement needs to look at the labor practices of those small family farms.

Comments [7]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Brother, Can You Spare a Lime?

Friday, April 11, 2014

David Karp, produce columnist for the Los Angeles Times and citrus researcher with the Department of Botany and Plant Sciences at UC-Riverside, explains the lime shortage going on right now - what is causing it, what it means for consumers and the restaurant industry, and how it is affecting farmers in Mexico, where 95% of limes bought in the US are grown.

Comments [5]

The Takeaway

Labor Leader Reflects on Chavez's Legacy

Friday, March 28, 2014

Ahead of Cesar Chavez Day—a multi-state holiday designed to honor the Chavez's service to the community—Dolores Huerta joins The Takeaway to reflect on the era the work of Chavez and what still needs to be done for farm workers and other laborers in this country.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The FDA, Antibiotics, and Animal Feed

Thursday, February 06, 2014

Antibiotic resistance claims 23,000 lives a year in the U.S.—and the overuse of antibiotics in livestock plays a role. Bryan Walsh looks at whether the FDA doing all it can to protect Americans, and looks at why antibiotics are used in animal feed in the first place and the risks of that practice. He’s written “New Report Says FDA Allowed “High Risk” Antibiotics to Be Used on Farm Animals.”

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The Takeaway

In Meat We Trust: America's Historic Relationship with Meat

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Americans consume about 275 lbs of meat annually per person—that's more than three times the global average. In her new book, “In Meat We Trust: An Unexpected History of Carnivore America,” author Maureen Ogle traces Americans' relationship with meat through the ages, from the days when early settlers used livestock to claim land, to the 20th century rise of big producers like Tyson and Purdue and present day calls for a return to locally-sourced, organic meat.

Comments [9]

The Leonard Lopate Show

“Symphony of the Soil”

Friday, October 11, 2013

Producer and director Deborah Koons Garcia and scientists Dr. Ignacio Chapela and Dr. Michael Hansen talk about the documentary “Symphony of the Soil,” which explores the complexity and mystery of soil. Filmed on four continents and sharing the voices of some of the world’s most esteemed soil scientists, farmers and activists, it shows that soil is a complex living organism, the foundation of life on earth. "Symphony of the Soil" opens on October 11 at the Quad Cinema.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Temple Grandin on Additives in Cattle Feed

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Temple Grandin talk about how cattle feed additives, like popular weight-gaining supplements, are changing cattle behavior, health, and the meat we eat.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Events in Egypt; Algebra; Muhammad Ali Outside the Ring; the Sequester; Temple Grandin

Thursday, August 22, 2013

On today’s show: a live report on the latest events in Egypt. Nicholson Baker explains why he thinks that advanced algebra shouldn’t be a high school requirement. Director Bill Siegel talks about his documentary “The Trials of Muhammad Ali,” about the legendary boxer’s life outside the ring. New York Times reporter Ron Nixon explains how the sequester is affecting the nation as a whole. And with grain prices on the rise, Temple Grandin describes what cattle farmers are feeding their herds to keep costs low, and its dramatic effects.

The Brian Lehrer Show

From Glass Ceiling to Grass Ceiling: Women Take Back the Farm

Tuesday, July 09, 2013

This interview originally aired live on July 9, 2013. An edited version was re-broadcast as part of a best-of show timed for Labor Day on September 2, 2013.

Journalist Lori Rotenberk talks about the spike in the number of women farmers over the past twenty years, and why so many women are turning their backs on the corporate world and picking up the spade.

 

Comments [8]

The Leonard Lopate Show

"American Meat" - Can Farming Be More Sustainable?

Friday, April 12, 2013

Graham Meriwether, director of the documentary “American Meat,” looks at whether sustainable farming can feed America. He looks at cattle, hog and chicken production in the U.S. and presents the viability of more humane, sustainable farming practices. The film explains how America arrived at its current industrial system and introduces industry leaders who are working to change it for the better. “American Meat” opens April 12 at Cinema Village.

Comments [16]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Fertilizer

Friday, April 12, 2013

Fertilizer is crucial for food—plants need it in order to grow and thrive. Harold Van Es, professor in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences at Cornell University, explains what fertilizer is made of, why it's so important, and how to manage it.

Let us know if you have a question! Leave it as a comment or call us at 212-433-9692.

 

Comments [8]

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Threat to Orange Juice

Monday, March 04, 2013

The U.S. orange industry is under siege from a disease killing citrus trees. Anna Kuchment, senior editor at Scientific American, talks about possible solutions and what it means for consumers.

 

Comments [8]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Community, Education, and Agriculture

Wednesday, December 05, 2012

Eric Herm examines the vital relationship between humans and nature and how our modern agricultural system and in many of our business and political policies have strained this relationship. In Surviving Ourselves: The Evolution of Community, Education, and Agriculture in the 21st Century, Herm, a fourth-generation farmer, shares his own personal experiences, as well as the inspiring stories of others changing the way we farm.

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

US Ethanol Requirements Could Cause a Global Food Crisis

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

The U.S. will convert up to 40 percent of its corn crop into ethanol this year. But as the country faces its worst drought in more than 50 years, can we afford to turn that food into fuel?

Comments [4]

The Takeaway

Secretary of Agriculture Outlines Plan to Cope with Drought

Thursday, August 02, 2012

As drought conditions worsen for much of the country, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is stepping in to provide some relief for farmers and ranchers. Joining us from Washington D.C. is U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Farmer Believes Government at Fault for Drought's Consequences

Thursday, August 02, 2012

As severe drought covers about two-thirds of the country, more than half of all U.S. counties have been designated primary disaster areas by the Department of Agriculture.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Midwest Drought's Ripple Effects

Monday, July 30, 2012

The drought continues throughout much of the United States. NPR food and agriculture correspondent Dan Charles looks at the effects on everything from factory farms to local food prices.

Comments [10]

Radiolab

Into the Abyss

Wednesday, April 04, 2012

For our Guts episode, producer Tim Howard bravely headed to Rutgers University to see, feel...and smell...a fistulated cow firsthand. Check out his pictures here.

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Comments [22]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: How to Save the World—Food Security

Friday, February 17, 2012

This week's Please Explain continues our series How to Save the World. Glenn Denning, Director, Center on Globalization and Sustainable Development at the Earth Institute at Columbia University, and J. Matthew Roney, Research Associate, Earth Policy Institute, examine the global food supply.

Comments [27]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Controversial Livestock Hormone

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Helena Bottemiller, a reporter for The Food & Environment Reporting Network, looks at the controversial animal feed additive, ractopamine hydrochloride, which is widely used in the united states but the EU and China have banned it’s use, citing health concerns.

Comments [6]