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Aging

The Brian Lehrer Show

Middle-Aged and Menopausal

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Sandra Tsing Loh, writer, comedian and author of The Madwoman in the Volvo: My Year of Raging Hormones (W. W. Norton & Company, 2014), talks about her new book in which she describes the joys and perils of being part of "Generation Triple M" (Middle-Aged Moms in Menopause).

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Clock Your Sleep: Seniors

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Dr. Shelby Harris, director of the Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program at Montefiore Medical Center talks to you about aging and sleep--whether seniors need less sleep and how sleep plays a role in other health issues as we age.

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The Takeaway

Adapting Society to a Growing, Aging Population

Thursday, March 13, 2014

This week, we've been pondering the significance of aging, and aging well in today's world. Detecting cancer or picking up on genes for Alzheimer's sounds pretty great, but many agree that our society may not have the infrastructure in place to adapt to an ever-growing, ever-aging population. Joining The Takeaway to discuss the intersection between the aging and the economy is Courtney Coile, associate professor of economics at Wellesley College.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Aging and Long-Term Unemployment

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Peter Coy, economics editor for Bloomberg Businessweek, talks about the CBO report on the effect of Obamacare on jobs, plus age discrimination's part in long-term unemployment. Then Ruth Finkelstein, senior vice president of policy and planning for the New York Academy of Medicine, continues the discussion on aging and long-term unemployment and talks about her work on the Age-Smart Awards Program.

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

P.J. O'Rourke's Generation

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

In his new book,The Baby Boom: How It Got That Way (And It Wasn’t My Fault) (And I’ll Never Do It Again) , author P.J. O'Rourke turns his scathing wit on himself and his demographic cohort -- boomers.

 

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Radiolab

Born Wet, Human Babies Are 75 Percent Water. Then Comes Drying

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

A fresh tomato is 93.5 percent water. A fresh baby girl or boy is 75 percent water. A banana, 74 percent. We all start wet, and then, inevitably, dry. A 1-year-old baby carries 10 percent less water; a male adult 15 percent less. Life is a slow evaporation, with some curious exceptions.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Love & Let Die

Friday, May 31, 2013

Lawrence Weschler, director of the New York Institute for the Humanities at NYU, and Diane Meier, chief executive officer of the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) and professor of geriatrics, internal medicine and medical ethics at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, discuss Saturday's symposium exploring the question of prolonging life in an era of limited resources.

 

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On Being

Rex Jung — Creativity and the Everyday Brain [remix]

Thursday, May 02, 2013

How do we prime our brains to take the meandering mental paths necessary for creativity? New techniques of brain imaging, Rex Jung says, are helping us gain a whole new view on the differences between intelligence, creativity, and personality. He unsettle

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On Being

[Unedited] Rex Jung and Krista Tippett

Thursday, May 02, 2013

How do we prime our brains to take the meandering mental paths necessary for creativity? New techniques of brain imaging, Rex Jung says, are helping us gain a whole new view on the differences between intelligence, creativity, and personality. He unsettle

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The Leonard Lopate Show

"56 Up"

Friday, January 04, 2013

Documentary filmmakerMichael Apted talks about the latest in his 7 Up series, "56 Up." Joining him is Tony Walker, one of the subjects who has been featured in the films since he was 7 years old.

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Grayest Generation: Older Parents

Monday, December 31, 2012

Americans are becoming parents at older and older ages. The average first-time mother is now four years older (25) than she was in 1970. Judith Shulevitz, science editor at The New Republic and author of their cover story "How Older Parenthood Will Upend American Society" talks about the impact for society, health, and families.

Comments [13]

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Grayest Generation: Older Parents

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Americans are becoming parents at older and older ages. The average first-time mother is now four years older (25) than she was in 1970. Judith Shulevitz, science editor at The New Republic and author of their cover story, "How Older Parenthood Will Upend American Society" talks about the impact for society, health, and families.

Comments [51]

Radiolab

Krulwich Wonders: A Metaphor For Forgetting (That You Might Remember)

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

NPR

Alzheimer's is the disease that creeps in and slowly erases what you know until, eventually, there's no more to erase. How this happens is still a mystery, but this short animation by Po Chou Chi tries to make poetic sense of what goes on.

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Soundcheck

Rod Stewart: Once Naughty, Now Nice

Wednesday, December 05, 2012

The 67-year-old British singer-songwriter recently released his tell-all memoir, Rod: An Autobiography, as well as his very first holiday record, Merry Christmas, Baby.

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Radiolab

Krulwich Wonders: New Superhero, 3,200 Years Old, Turns Air Into Wood Superfast

Tuesday, December 04, 2012

NPR

"The President" is a 3,200-year-old giant sequoia that clocks in at 247 feet tall and counting. And contrary to most living things we can think of, giant sequoias grow faster later in life than earlier in life.

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The Takeaway

'Triumphs of Experience': Studying the Happy Life

Friday, November 30, 2012

Between 1939 and 1944, more than 200 Harvard students – all "physically and mentally healthy" men – were recruited to participate in a study. The 200-some odd students had the privilege of being tracked by Harvard Medical School for the rest of their lives. Dr. George Vaillaint, professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and author of "Triumphs of Experience" has been overseeing the study since his early 30s. He set out to discover what predicts a happy life.

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Operavore

The Song of the Ancient Soprano

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

"There are a still some very old singers who walk among us, heads only slightly bowed, and seem like messengers from that lost world of opera in the 1920s and 1930s," writes Fred Plotkin. "They actually did know Puccini."

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The Takeaway

Who Wants To Live Forever?

Friday, August 31, 2012

While it seems we don’t want to live much longer than we do now, advanced aging is looking more and more like a reality. With improved hygiene, nutrition and medical advances, the United Nations predicts that within the next century, it could be normal to live to 100 years old.

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On Being

Jane Gross — The Far Shore of Aging [remix]

Thursday, July 26, 2012

We are living longer, for better and for worse. And the story of aging is one that too often goes untended. Our guest tells us that we not only have to care for our parents — but for ourselves.

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On Being

[Unedited] Jane Gross with Krista Tippett

Thursday, July 26, 2012

We are living longer, for better and for worse. And the story of aging is one that too often goes untended. Our guest tells us that we not only have to care for our parents — but for ourselves.

Comment