Streams

 

African Americans

The Brian Lehrer Show

Michael Eric Dyson on the 'Ghost' of Fellow Intellectual Cornel West

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

In an ongoing feud between two of the most prominent black intellectuals, Georgetown professor Michael Eric Dyson takes on Cornel West's "bitter" assessment of President Obama.

Comments [70]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Is There Such a Thing As 'The Black Community'?

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Ron Christie contends there is no monolithic black community. Do you agree?

Comments [60]

The Takeaway

Rosa Parks' Legacy is Trapped in a New York Warehouse

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Amid celebrations of the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act, Rosa Parks' belongings are trapped in a Harlem warehouse, and important pieces of her legacy have remained hidden from public view.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Black Barbershops and the Civil Rights Movement

Friday, January 31, 2014

Historian Quincy T. Mills chronicles the cultural history of black barbershops as businesses and civic institutions. He talks about how barbers played a significant though complicated role in 20th-century racial politics. His book Cutting Along the Color Line: Barbershops is a sweeping history of an iconic cultural establishment that shows how black entrepreneurship was linked to the struggle for equality.

Comments [8]

The Brian Lehrer Show

An Hour With Henry Louis Gates Jr.

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Harvard University professor and director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research and Alphonse Fletcher University Professor at Harvard University, Henry Louis Gates Jr., talks about his new six-part series airing on PBS starting tonight, "The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross."

Comments [56]

The Takeaway

Homeschooling on the Rise Among African-Americans

Monday, March 19, 2012

According to the National Home Education Research Institute (NHEI), about two million American children (about 4 percent of all American students) receive their education at home. The NHEI claims that those families are usually white Christians in rural areas who disagree with the public school system on religious grounds. 

Comments [4]

The Takeaway

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's New Children's Book on African American Inventors and Black History

Friday, February 10, 2012

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is a jack of all trades — and a master of each. During his 20 year NBA career with the Milwaukee Bucks and Los Angeles Lakers, he won six NBA championships and a record six regular season MVP Awards. He also made a big splash as an actor, debuting in Bruce Lee's "Game of Death" and making notable cameos in films like "Airplane!." And now, he's the author of "What Color Is My World?," a book for children about African-American inventors.

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The Takeaway

The Battle Over History Curriculum in Schools

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Two conversations this week on the sensitivity of certain subjects in the classroom produced lots of reaction from listeners. A ban on ethnic studies in Tuscon Arizona, and a resistance to teaching Climate Change as an accepted body of knowledge in certain school districts around the country raises a broader question. Are there pieces of history and science that are simply too hot to handle in a classroom where active debate may get away from the truth and consensus on what to teach may be hard to find?

Comments [11]

The Leonard Lopate Show

A Culinary Journey from Africa to America

Monday, September 05, 2011

Cookbook author Jessica Harris talks about the history of African American cuisine. High on the Hog: A Culinary Journey from Africa to America takes readers on a journey from Africa across the Atlantic to America, tracking the trials that the people and the food have undergone along the way—from chitlins and ham hocks to fried chicken and vegan soul.  She details how each came to form such an important part of African American culture, history, and identity.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Culinary Journey from Africa to America

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Cookbook author Jessica Harris talks about the history of African American cuisine. High on the Hog: A Culinary Journey from Africa to America takes readers on a journey from Africa across the Atlantic to America, tracking the trials that the people and the food have undergone along the way—from chitlins and ham hocks to fried chicken and vegan soul.  She details how each came to form such an important part of African American culture, history, and identity.

Comments [4]

The Takeaway

Oprah Winfrey and Race in America

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Today Oprah Winfrey signs off after 25 years as the queen of daytime talk. Oprah has built a multi-billion-dollar media empire. She’s one of only two African-Americans ever to grace the Forbes billionaire list — and the only black woman ever to do so. Many would argue that her success as one of the few black women in television has forever changed the face of the medium. So whether you’re a critic or a diehard fan, there’s no doubt that Oprah has had quite an impact — particularly on the African-American community.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

What Signifies Middle Class for African Americans?

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

As we continue trying to define what it means to be middle class in America, we turn our focus to the black community. Are the indicators of middle class life for black America different from those for white America?

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The Takeaway

Fears of Discrimination Over Sickle Cell Testing

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

It is now mandatory that athletes wanting to particpate in NCAA Division I sports be tested for sickle cell anemia. The new rule has some people worried that it could lead to racial discrimination.

Put in affect in April, it's aimed to prevent the sudden death of young athletes such as 19-year-old Dale Lloyd II, who died suddenly in 2006 after a rigorous practice for Rice University's football team.

Comments [2]