Streams

 

 

African American History

Studio 360

Rediscovering the Hidden Music of the Civil Rights Movement

Thursday, April 02, 2015

A huge cache of potent protest music from the Civil Rights Movement has been hiding for decades.

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Studio 360

How Alan Lomax Segregated Music

Thursday, February 05, 2015

Musicologist Alan Lomax had a specific idea of what African-American music should sound like — an idea that reinforced stereotypes instead of breaking them down.

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The Takeaway

Rosa Parks' Legacy is Trapped in a New York Warehouse

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Amid celebrations of the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act, Rosa Parks' belongings are trapped in a Harlem warehouse, and important pieces of her legacy have remained hidden from public view.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Civil Rights and the March Against Fear

Thursday, February 06, 2014

Aram Goudsouzian tells the story of one of the central dramas of the civil rights era—the “March Against Fear” in Mississippi and the shooting of the leader of the march, James Meredith. Goudsouzian's book Down to the Crossroads: Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Meredith March Against Fear reveals the legacy of an event that would both integrate African Americans into the political system and inspire bolder protests against them. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

An Hour With Henry Louis Gates Jr.

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Harvard University professor and director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research and Alphonse Fletcher University Professor at Harvard University, Henry Louis Gates Jr., talks about his new six-part series airing on PBS starting tonight, "The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross."

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The Brian Lehrer Show

August Wilson Cycle

Friday, September 20, 2013

WNYC's The Greene Space is in the midst of presenting all ten plays that form August Wilson's American Century Cycle. Artistic director Ruben Santiago Hudson, actor and associate artistic director Stephen McKinley Henderson, and the project’s audio theater producer Arthur Yorinks talk about the playwright and his work, its depiction of African American history, and the process of converting stage productions to radio drama.

→Check ticket availability for the remaining performances at The Greene Space.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Brooklyn’s Secret African-American Basketball History

Friday, February 08, 2013

This live interview with Claude Johnson originally aired on February 8, 2013. An edited version was aired on July 5, 2013 as part of a special episode of The Brian Lehrer Show. 

When you think "black pioneering athlete" and "Brooklyn" you likely think Jackie Robinson. But Brooklyn played a role in integrating basketball too. Claude Johnson amateur historian researching the "Black Fives" teams -- to be honored at a ceremony Sunday at the Barclays Center -- discusses the early history of basketball in the area.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

James L. Farmer Jr. Advocates Revolutionary Freedoms for African-Americans

Friday, September 21, 2012

"America is being forced to face itself," James Farmer proclaims in this 1963 Overseas Press Club appearance, before discussing the upcoming march on Washington and the historical roots of the civil rights struggle.

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The Takeaway

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's New Children's Book on African American Inventors and Black History

Friday, February 10, 2012

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is a jack of all trades — and a master of each. During his 20 year NBA career with the Milwaukee Bucks and Los Angeles Lakers, he won six NBA championships and a record six regular season MVP Awards. He also made a big splash as an actor, debuting in Bruce Lee's "Game of Death" and making notable cameos in films like "Airplane!." And now, he's the author of "What Color Is My World?," a book for children about African-American inventors.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Her Harlem

Friday, August 19, 2011

Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts, winner of the Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer's Award, contributor to Transition Magazine and author of Harlem is Nowhere: A Journey to the Mecca of Black America, talks about the history and future of Harlem as the center of Black America.

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The Takeaway

How the 'Red Summer' of 1919 Sparked the Civil Rights Movement

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Many of us trace the Civil Rights movement back to the Montgomery Bus Boycott and Rosa Parks' arrest in 1955. But the true beginning may have been during the summer of 1919, remembered as "Red Summer," when race riots erupted across the country. At that time, NAACP membership grew exponentially, as black World War I veterans returned from fighting for democracy abroad and demanded freedom at home. Despite President Woodrow Wilson's promise to further human rights in the U.S., the federal government turned a blind eye and did little to even to protect African-Americans from racial violence.

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The Takeaway

Excerpt: 'Red Summer'

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

An excerpt from "Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America," by Cameron McWhirter.

1.
Carswell Grove
[T]here has been nobody suffered in this matter like I have. I did not do nothing at all to cause that riot.
JOE RUFFIN

1. Carswell Grove

[T]here has been nobody suffered in this matter like I have. I did not do nothing at all to cause that riot.

JOE RUFFIN

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Michael Eric Dyson: Marriage Pledge

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

There's no question that African American families are under assault and that the marriageable pool index of Black people is being undermined by what--over-incarceration of Black men. Black women are being left alone because many Black men are being unjustly and unfairly imprisoned, besides the destructive practices that may be nurtured within the culture.

— Michael Eric Dyson professor of sociology at Georgetown University and author of Can You Hear Me Now?: The Inspiration, Wisdom, and Insight of Michael Eric Dyson, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [65]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Never In My Wildest Dreams

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Belva Davis, broadcast journalist and author of Never in My Wildest Dreams: A Black Woman's Life in Journalism, talks about her career as an African-American journalist.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

A Family History of African Americans in Nineteenth-Century New York

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Carla L. Peterson tells the history of African-American elites in New York City, and of her nineteenth-century ancestors and the world they lived in. Black Gotham: A Family History of African Americans in Nineteenth-Century New York City challenges many of the accepted ideas about African-American history, slavery, freedom, racism, and the cosmopolitan black elite.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Her Harlem

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts, winner of the Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer's Award, contributor to Transition Magazine and author of Harlem is Nowhere: A Journey to the Mecca of Black America, talks about the history and future of Harlem as the center of Black America.

Sharifa will be at the Hue-Man Bookstore and Cafe tonight at 6pm.

Comments [18]

The Takeaway

Tales from 'The Great Migration'

Thursday, November 25, 2010

The massive migration of black Americans from the South to the North in the early part of last century changed the social and cultural landscape of America forever. Six million African Americans eventually left the South around 1920. Before then, 90 percent of all African Americans lived in the south. By 1970, nearly half lived elsewhere in the country.

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The Takeaway

Imagining Zora Neale Hurston as a Girl Detective

Monday, November 08, 2010

Zora and Me” fictionalizes the childhood of the Harlem Renaissance writer, folklorist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston. (Hurston was born in 1891, lived through the Jim Crow south, and died in 1960.) The young adult novel is the first in a planned trilogy which imagines Hurston as a girl detective in her all-black hometown of Eatonville, Florida, at the start of the 20th century.

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The Takeaway

Rewriting African-American History

Thursday, October 21, 2010

The telling of history is a monumental task and responsibility that all historians hold sacred. Historian Thomas C. Holt has gained prominence as the one of the foremost respected historians of American and African-American History.

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The Takeaway

Famous Maryland Cabin Did Not Belong to 'Uncle Tom'

Tuesday, October 05, 2010

Officials in Montgomery County, Maryland, have spent $2 million to acquire and maintain a two-story colonial home and log cabin formerly believed to be the residence of Josiah Henson, the model for the protagonist in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel, "Uncle Tom's Cabin." As it turns out, officials had it wrong and Henson never lived in that cabin. We talk with David Rotenstein, who served on the county's Historic Preservation Commission at the time of the purchase.

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