Streams

 

African American

The Takeaway

'The End of Anger,' New Optimism in the Black Community

Wednesday, June 01, 2011

Just before the 2010 Midterm Elections, a CBS News poll found that black Americans were more likely than whites to express optimism about the economy. And while nearly 50 percent of black Americans thought America’s next generation would be better off, only 16 percent of white Americans thought the same.

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The Takeaway

Census Reveals Great Reversal of 'Great Migration'

Friday, March 25, 2011

The latest Census confirms that once-segregated Southern cities like Atlanta, Dallas, Houston and Miami are luring African Americans from northern metro areas like New York and Chicago. Today, 57 percent of the nation’s black population now lives in the South, which is the highest it's been since 1960. Why are we witnessing a Great Reversal of the Great Migration? For the answer we speak with Isabel Wilkerson, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author of “The Warmth of Other Suns: the Epic Story of America’s Great Migration.”

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The Takeaway

A Journey From Black to White

Thursday, February 17, 2011

The narrative of African Americans “passing” into white culture has long persisted. These stories are often tragic and filled with shame, secrecy, and the abandonment of home and family. In his new book, “The Invisible Line,” Daniel Sharfstein looks at three families that were once identified as black and are now viewed as white. These stories are ones of pride as white families reconnect with their African-American roots.

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The Takeaway

Walter Mosley on 'The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey'

Thursday, November 11, 2010

Walter Mosley is widely known for his best-selling historical mysteries featuring Easy Rawlins — a hard-boiled black detective and World War II veteran living in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles. But Mosley's writing spans a number of genres, including science fiction, graphic novels, young adult literature, and political non-fiction. His newest book is called “The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey.” It centers on 91-year-old Ptolemy Grey, an African American living alone in violent South Central L.A.. Suffering from dementia and poor health, Ptolemy seems ready to give up on life, until he meets a 17-year-old girl who may be able to help him recover his lucidity...at a cost.

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The Takeaway

Imagining Zora Neale Hurston as a Girl Detective

Monday, November 08, 2010

Zora and Me” fictionalizes the childhood of the Harlem Renaissance writer, folklorist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston. (Hurston was born in 1891, lived through the Jim Crow south, and died in 1960.) The young adult novel is the first in a planned trilogy which imagines Hurston as a girl detective in her all-black hometown of Eatonville, Florida, at the start of the 20th century.

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The Takeaway

How Ethnicity Factored in the Midterms

Wednesday, November 03, 2010

Last night, Latinos carried Harry Reid to victory in Nevada, while more blacks voted for Republican candidates than ever before. Black Republicans made gains in the House, though in the Senate, there will no longer be a black presence. Andra Gillespie, assistant professor of political science at Emory University, and Theeda Skocpol look at how Latinos and blacks shaped yesterday's elections.

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It's A Free Country ®

Obama and the Base that Isn't

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

WNYC
"There is no doubt that when Barack Obama chose Geitner and Summers it was a slap in the face of poor people it was a slap in the face of working people it was clear that jobs and homes and crime would be after thoughts and the first priority would the investment banks, Wall Street, elites and oligarchs. It was a very revealing move."

- Cornel West, University Professor in the Center for African American Studies at Princeton University, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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It's A Free Country ®

Voter Turnout Not as Bad as Thought, But Still Anemic in Certain Quarters

Monday, October 25, 2010

WNYC
The people who vote tend to be better educated, higher income, they own their own homes, they are whiter, they tend to be older. So we have this skew in our electoral system...And by the way, in a midterm election that skewness is even more pronounced than in a presidential election.

- Michael McDonald,professor of government and politics at George Mason University

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It's A Free Blog

Will the Minority Vote Matter?

Monday, October 18, 2010

Pundits are predicting that the black and Latino vote can shape the results this year, something we’ve heard every election for the last 40 years. But this year, it looks possible for them to affect national politics beyond the boundaries of their districts.

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The Takeaway

The NAACP Reaches out to LGBT Community

Friday, September 24, 2010

This week, the NAACP’s president, Benjamin Jealous, did something previously unheard of for the organization: He encouraged members of New York’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center to work with him and specifically, to attend the NAACP march for jobs and justice in Washington next month. 

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The Takeaway

The History of the Civil Rights Movement and the Women Who Inspired It

Wednesday, September 08, 2010

Consider the history of the civil rights movement, but set aside for a moment the well-known stories from men: those of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Emmett Till, Medgar Evers and Andrew Goodman. If we examine the movement through the eyes of the women there at the time, what would the story sound like? 

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The Takeaway

Preaching HIV Prevention from the Pulpit

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Today, the Obama administration unveils a new plan to combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic in this country. Currently, more than 1.1 million Americans are infected with the virus, and infection rates are highest in the African-American community. African-Americans make up 12 percent of the US population, but make up more than half of new HIV/AIDS cases. It seems conventional methods of education on prevention and access to medicine are not effectively reaching this high-risk community. Many people pay attention to words from the pulpit: In some communities, the church might be the place where HIV prevention can best be taught.

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The Takeaway

Rewriting the Black American Family

Friday, April 30, 2010

In literature, the African-American family has changed and morphed over the years. From the churchgoing family of James Baldwin's "Go Tell It On The Mountain" to the rural female-led household of Toni Morrison's "Beloved" to the inner city of Sapphire's "Push."  But now, the black American family is being rewritten all over again in a totally new way. We take a look at three upcoming books about family written by black men.

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The Takeaway

The Success and Scrutiny of Tyler Perry

Friday, April 02, 2010

Tyler Perry’s latest film, “Why Did I Get Married Too?”, hits theatres nationwide today. And, as with all of his films, it’s expected to open at number one or number two at the box office and rake in tens of millions of dollars over the coming weeks.

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The Takeaway

Singing Spirituals at the White House

Thursday, February 11, 2010

This song, “Lord, I Done Done What You Told Me To Do” echoed through the halls of the White House on Wednesday night.

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The Takeaway

Unemployment's Long Term Impacts

Thursday, February 11, 2010

Overall unemployment numbers for January dropped slightly below ten percent, but for particular groups – adult men, African Americans and immigrants – unemployment is still higher than average. 

Today we’re looking at the long term impacts of high unemployment. Could this recession shape a generation, as the Great Depression did? Do unemployed Americans still think of their country as a land of opportunity?

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Studio 360

Lorna Simpson

Saturday, November 06, 2004

In Lorna Simpson’s video Corridor, two women perform the mundane rituals of life in two different period homes. Projected side by side, the images might simply be voyeuristic if it weren’t for our knowledge that one African-American woman is living in the politically tumultuous year 1860 and the other in ...

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Studio 360

Cakewalk

Saturday, October 16, 2004

Some parodies are so clever that those being mocked don’t even realize. The cakewalk dance was created by African American slaves to poke fun of their masters. The masters watched with delight, and years later, vaudeville performers — white men in blackface — started performing the cakewalk in their shows. ...

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Studio 360

Panhandling for Reparations

Saturday, May 08, 2004

Conceptual artist damali ayo has an ongoing performance called "living flag" that she’s taking to busy street corners all over the country. For the performance, she collects reparations for the enslavement of African Americans by sitting on the street as a panhandler. There, on the sidewalk, ayo accepts ...

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Studio 360

Golliwog

Saturday, December 20, 2003

One of the most persistent racist images in American culture is one that you may not be able to name. It's a doll, called a Golliwog, and it has haunted the artist Damali Ayo for a long time.

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