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Afghanistan War

The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Keeping the Taliban Out of Afghanistan, Morning Headlines

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Some of the tactics of keeping the Taliban out used by U.S. forces appear to be working in Afghanistan. But will the advances made recently keep the Taliban from a resurgence when the allied forces leave? 

 

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The Takeaway

Rethinking War in Afghanistan: Marjah Edition

Monday, December 13, 2010

This week, the White House will take another look at its war strategy in Afghanistan. Just over the weekend, six U.S. soldiers were killed in a suicide attack in Kandahar. One of the main questions the administration will be trying to answer: Was sending 30,000 extra American troops to that country the right move? To help try and answer it for ourselves, we'll explore one location that has received additional troops: Marjah in Helmand Province.

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: A Decade in Afghanistan Approaches, Morning Headlines

Thursday, December 02, 2010

As the U.S. and NATO forces approach a decade of war in Afghanistan, there are chances for reflection. As occupiers, what have we learned about strategy in that country? 

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Video Gamer Salman Rushdie, Morning Headlines

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

Has he unlocked any secret levels? Stayed up till 4 a.m. trying to beat "Goldeneye 007" ? Maybe not, but Salman Rushdie does like him some video games. 

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, October 18, 2010

David Sanger joins Brian Zumhagen to discuss the campaign trail and a big debate among Demcrats.

The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, October 11, 2010

Kerry Nolan and NYT correspondent David Sanger talk about a new call for a moratorium on foreclosures.  Also, they discuss why the National Security Advisor is being replaced so quickly.

The Takeaway

9 Years in Afghanistan

Thursday, October 07, 2010

On October 7th, 2001, less than a month after the attacks of September 11, American and British forces entered Afghanistan seeking to disrupt terrorist activities and capture members of al-Qaida. Nine years later we look back and reflect on one of the longest armed conflicts the U.S. has ever seen. Gideon Rose, editor of Foreign Affairs joins us for the hour.

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The Takeaway

Vietnam Vet Says More Medals of Honor Must Be Awarded

Wednesday, October 06, 2010

President Obama will award the Medal of Honor today to the parents of Staff Sergeant Robbie Miller, who was killed in Afghanistan. This will be only the third time the Medal of Honor has been awarded, in what has become the U.S.'s longest war. Yesterday we talked about why so few Medals of Honor have been awarded during recent wars. Takeaway listener and Vietnam War veteran George J. Robinson explains why he believes many more servicemembers deserve this recognition.

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The Takeaway

Woodward Book Details Bitter Rift Among Obama Advisors Over Afghanistan

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Washington is atwitter (and Twittering) this morning over a new book by Bob Woodward. In "Obama's War," the forthcoming book by the veteran Washington Post reporter, high ranking administration officials dish about the bitter divide between the president's national security team over strategy in the war in Afghanistan. 

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The Takeaway

Your Take: A Leadership Crisis for Obama?

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

With news of a staff shakeup in the Obama White House and revelations that Obama's national security team is deeply, bitterly divided over strategy in the Afghanistan war, is the president having a leadership crisis, or is this just typical midterm angst? How well is the president leading his staff, and the country?

"There is a division within this administration of 'tribes.' There's the Clinton tribe and the Obama campaign tribe. And is a story of an outsider, to some extent, coming to Washington and learning what it's like to be commander-in-chief." — Peter Baker of The New York Times

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The Takeaway

Dexter Filkins on Corruption in Afghanistan

Thursday, August 26, 2010

Mohammad Zia Salehi, a close advisor to Afghan President Hamid Karzai, was arrested on corruption charges in July and then released after President Karzai intervened. The incident was a recent example of one of the country's biggest challenges in establishing stability: eradicating corruption. Some of those who are allegedly corrupt are also on the CIA payroll. Are we doing enough to get rid of corruption in that country, both in the government itself and in our dealings with people there?

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The Takeaway

Fighting Corruption in Afghanistan: Are We Doing Enough?

Thursday, August 26, 2010

One of the biggest threats to Afghanistan's security is corruption in the Afghan government. In July, a close advisor to Afghan President Hamid Karzai was arrested on corruption charges, and then released after President Karzai intervened. Are we doing enough to eradicate issues of corruption in that country, both in the government itself and in our dealings with people there?

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The Takeaway

Taliban Stones Young Couple to Death in Afghanistan

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

For the first time in nearly a decade of war in Afghanistan, the Taliban has executed a young couple by stoning for having a relationship out of wedlock.

Carried out on Sunday by townspeople and even family members of the couple who tricked them into returning after trying to elope, the execution was the latest in a string of harsh punishments by the former regime, which include lashing and amputation. Already some in the country are calling the execution appropriate. Just a week ago a group of 350 religious scholars meeting with government officials called for more punishment under Sharia law.

Are we seeing a resurgence of the Taliban’s extreme punishment, in a long and painful war that was meant to eradicate it? What does the recent violence say about our efforts, and about the Taliban in Afghanistan?

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The Takeaway

'Three Cups of Tea' Author Urges Education in Afghanistan, Not War

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Since 1993, Greg Mortenson has dedicated his life to building schools, mostly for girls, in the mountainous regions of Afghanistan and Pakistan. Author of The New York Times best-seller, "Three Cups of Tea," Greg Mortenson, approaches diplomacy in Afghanistan through education and working with village elders. And even as a strong advocate against the war there, he and his book have been warmly embraced by top ranking members of the U.S. command in Afghanistan, who have turned to Mortenson for advice on how to approach locals there.

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Azi Paybarah

Tasini: Rangel Just Voted to Pay for the War

Friday, July 09, 2010

WNYC

Rep. Charlie Rangel's claim that congress shouldn't spend any more money on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan--except to leave--is challenged by Jonathan Tasini who says Rangel just voted to fund the war.

Tasini:

Charlie Rangel just voted, along with many Democrats, for billions of dollars more for the Afghanistan war, and he will not face another vote on the Afghanistan war until after the September 14 primary. This is unconscionable.

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The Takeaway

New Rules Ease Process for Veterans Claiming PTSD

Thursday, July 08, 2010

The Department of Veterans Affairs is set to issue new rules, as early as Monday, which should simplify the way veterans receive compensation for post-traumatic stress disorder. PTSD is one of the most common psychological injuries afflicting veterans today and creating new regulations for treatment is an attempt to break some of the barriers to treatment.

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The Takeaway

Inside Kabul's First Prison for Women

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

Western countries celebrated the liberation of women in Afghanistan from the Taliban-controlled government when the U.S. invaded in 2001. However, as the war in the country continues in the post-Taliban era, women's rights are not secure. Badam Bagh, Kabul's only prison for women is filled with stories about the violation of women's rights.

In one instance, a 16-year-old girl was sentenced to 18 months in prison after a boy came to her home to propose without sending his parents first; another was arrested when her husband accused her of adultery. The women's prison is an improvement of sorts, before it existed, female prisoners were incarcerated alongside men, and there were reports of rape. But even at Badam Bagh, "The Almond Garden," it becomes clear that Afghan women are still struggling without rights.

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