Streams

 

Adam Davidson

Soundcheck

Director Danny Boyle; Omar Sosa Gets 'Kind Of Blue'; Adam Davidson On Ticket Scalping

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

In this episode: Academy Award-winning director Danny Boyle talks about an unseen character from most of his films, the soundtrack. Boyle tells Soundcheck about handpicking music for Trainspotting, 28 Days Later, and most recently, his high-tech heist noir Trance.

Grammy-nominated composer and pianist Omar Sosa was inspired by Miles Davis' Kind Of Blue for his new record. Hear Sosa play songs from Eggun, which carries the spirit of Davis, live in the Soundcheck studio. 

And Planet Money's Adam Davidson explains why even with ticket scalping concert ticket prices are just too low. 

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

A New York Without Rent Regulation?

Monday, July 29, 2013

What would happen if New York did away with rent regulation? NPR Planet Money co-founder and New York Times contributor Adam Davidson discusses possible alternatives. 

Comments [23]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Rent Regulation; Senior Immigrants; Prospect Park

Monday, July 29, 2013

Kathleen Hunter, congressional reporter for Bloomberg News, rounds up the news out of Washington, including options for the next leader of the Fed and Obama’s recent economic speeches. Plus: Adam Davidson, co-founder of NPR’s Planet Money and a New York Times contributor, breaks down the arguments for and against rent regulation; a check-in on all the local political races; senior immigrants; and the history and future of Prospect Park. 

Soundcheck

It’s The Economy Of Ticket Scalping, Stupid!

Monday, June 10, 2013

Adam Davidson, of NPR’s Planet Money podcast, explains why economists are finding that ticket prices for concerts are often much too low.  

Comments [1]

Soundcheck

The Economy Of Ticket Scalping; That Was A Hit?!?; Jon Hopkins Plays Live

Monday, June 10, 2013

In this episode: Adam Davidson of NPR’s Planet Money podcast talks about his recent New York Times story on ticket scalping, and explains why economists are finding that ticket prices for concerts are often much too low.  

Also: Brooklyn-based writer Paul Ford joins us for another edition of “That Was a Hit?!?” to tell us the story of 1963’s “Sukiyaki,” the only Japanese-language pop song to ever hit No. 1 on Billboard’s Hot 100.

And: English electronic musician and producer Jon Hopkins plays songs from his new album Immunity. And, he explains how Brian Eno changed his approach to music.