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1960S

On The Media

Baltimore's Feedback Loop

Friday, May 01, 2015

The protests in Baltimore over the death of Freddie Gray evoke uprisings of the '60s, reminding us that the problems driving people to the streets today have profound historical roots. 

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Selected Shorts

Strike and Fade

Friday, November 28, 2014

Earning street cred.

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Selected Shorts

Homegirls on St. Nicholas Avenue

Friday, November 28, 2014

Malcolm X turned her life around.

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Selected Shorts

So You Want to Change the World?

Friday, November 28, 2014

Hope and anger in the 1960s.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

In the Recording Studio with The Beatles, Rolling Stones, and Led Zeppelin

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Glyn Johns talks about working as an engineer and a producer on some of the most iconic albums of the 20th century with The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, The Who and more.

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Soundcheck

Remembering Gerry Goffin, And His Unusual Partnership With Carole King

Friday, June 20, 2014

Because of the Tony Award-winning musical Beautiful, Gerry Goffin's name recognition at the time of his death yesterday, at 75, was higher than it had been since the 1960s, when he and his first wife Carole King burst onto the American music scene with a string of enduring hits.. Host John Schaefer looks back at the many hits they penned together. 

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Movies on the Radio

105 Years of Film Music: Part Five - The 1960s

Saturday, May 31, 2014

The tumultuous '60s brought changes of attitude and style to the scoring of films. The symphonic sound established in the '30s and '40s went out of fashion, replaced by pop-influenced eclecticism.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: So You Want to Change the World?

Friday, October 18, 2013

Robert Sean Leonard hosts three stories about revolution, and Edie Falco makes her SHORTS debut.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The FBI's War on Student Radicals, and Reagan's Rise to Power

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

Investigative reporter Seth Rosenfeld traces the FBI’s secret involvement with three iconic figures who clashed at Berkeley during the 1960s: the ambitious neophyte politician Ronald Reagan, the fierce but fragile radical Mario Savio, and the liberal university president Clark Kerr. Subversives: The FBI's War on Student Radicals, and Reagan's Rise to Power looks at the campus counterculture and reveals how the FBI’s covert operations—led by Reagan’s friend J. Edgar Hoover—helped ignite an era of protest, undermine the Democrats, and benefit Reagan personally and politically.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Dancing in the Street, Activist Song

Friday, July 12, 2013

Mark Kurlansky tells how the song “Dancing in the Street” became an anthem for a changing America. It was released in the summer of 1964—the time of the Mississippi Freedom Summer, the Berkeley Free Speech Movement, the beginning of the Vietnam War, the passage of the Civil Rights Act, and the lead-up to a dramatic election. Kurlansky’s book Ready for a Brand New Beat explains how “Dancing in the Street” became an activist anthem.

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Soundcheck

The Past And Present Of Beach Party Movies

Thursday, July 11, 2013

The so-called "beach party" films of the early 1960's -- which starred actors like Annette Funicello and Frankie Avalon -- were a hugely successful genre full of the most popular music acts of the day. But as the Vietnam War and other protest movements escalated in the mid-'60s, the lighthearted films went out with the tide. Now, Disney is attempting to reboot the beach party movie franchise with a  new made-for-TV film that revisits the old genre. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Golden Age of Hijacking

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Brendan I. Koerner describes how in 1968 airplane hijackings had become routine, and that over a five-year period the desperate and disillusioned would seize commercial jets nearly once a week, using guns, bombs, and jars of acid. Some hijackers wanted to escape to another country, others aimed to swap hostages for cash. In The Skies Belong to Us: Love and Terror in the Golden Age of Hijacking Koerner writes about cast of characters ranging from exiled Black Panthers to African despots to French movie stars, and paints a psychological portrait of America at a turbulent time.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Following Up: The Culture Wars

Friday, October 26, 2012

Robert O. Self, historian and author of All in the Family: The Realignment of American Democracy Since the 1960s, follows up on this week's 30 Issues in 30 Days topics and talks about how the post-'70s political realignment and the "culture wars" continue to reverberate in U.S. politics.

 

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Good Girls Revolt at Newsweek

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Lynn Povich talks about working at Newsweek in the 1960s, and discovering that women researchers sometimes became reporters, rarely writers, and never editors. She was a ringleader of the 46 Newsweek women who charged the magazine with discrimination in hiring and promotion in 1970. It was the first female class action lawsuit—and the first by women journalists. In The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace, she tells the story of this turning point through the lives of several participants.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: Miracles Can Happen

Sunday, May 20, 2012

This program includes two stories featuring improbable events, one involving the 1960s, the other an uncanny go-to guy. 

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Soundcheck

LaLa Brooks of The Crystals

Thursday, April 26, 2012

With ‘60s girl group The Crystals, LaLa Brooks made earworms out of songs like “Da Doo Ron Ron,” “Then He Kissed Me” and the still-controversial song “He Hit Me (And It Felt Like a Kiss),” which was written by Carole King and Gerry Goffin. Brooks joins us in studio to talk about teen stardom, touring through a segregated south, working with Dick Clark, and more.

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Soundcheck

Johnny Colon Does the Boogaloo

Monday, April 23, 2012

In the 1960s and ‘70s, Latin boogaloo arose from the jazz, soul and R&B traditions around New York. Spanish Harlem native Johnny Colon was part of the boogaloo wave and helped define the iconic sound with hits like like “Boogaloo Blues." Today, the bandleader, pianist and educator joins us for a look at boogaloo's past and present.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Freedom Riders

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

From May to December 1961, more than 400 black and white Americans risked their lives by traveling together through the Deep South, deliberately violating Jim Crow laws. These Freedom Riders’ beliefs in non-violent activism was tested as violence and racism greeted them. Dr. Bernard LaFayette Jr., cofounder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and participant in the Freedom Rides, and Gerald Stern, who was a young civil rights lawyer in the Justice Department at the time, discuss the Freedom Riders actions and the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s and look at the legacy of the movement today.

In 2011, PBS released Stanley Nelson’s American Experience documentary film Freedom Riders.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ed Sanders on the Fugs and Counterculture in the Lower East Side

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Ed Sanders describes New York's downtown Bohemia in the 1960s and traces the career of the postmodern, innovative anarcho-folk-rock band the Fugs—formed in 1964 by Sanders and his neighbor, the legendary Tuli Kupferberg. He tells the story in his memoir Fug You: An Informal History of the Peace Eye Bookstore, the F**k You Press, the Fugs, and Counterculture in the Lower East Side.

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Studio 360

Morals on Film

Saturday, April 23, 2005

If you came of age during the 60s or before, you may remember short instructional films about what to do if a stanger talks to you, or how to behave if they drop the atom bomb. The Prelinger Archive has 48,000 of these films, chronicling American morals and ...

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