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Episode #52

NYC Tech: Who’s Your Daddy?

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Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Mayor Bloomberg likes to take credit for transforming New York City into the second biggest technology economy in the country. Does he deserve it? 

Silicon Alley power players are certainly willing to give the mayor some major kudos: They respect the man that built his own tech enterprise — the Bloomberg terminal — into a multibillion-dollar empire.  

This week New Tech City talks to New York's software developers, engineers and startup CEOs about the impact of having an "entrepreneur-in-chief" running City Hall for 12 years.

Overall, Mayor Bloomberg gets a glowing review from residents of Silicon Alley. But when it comes to the nuts and bolts of how and why the city's tech sector has grown, there's room for debate. 

Editors:

Andrea Bernstein

Google's Top NYC Engineer on City's Tech Economy

Craig Nevill-Manning is Google's chief engineer in New York City. In fact, saying he built the company's software engineering department in the city from scratch is no exaggeration. 

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