Streams

Wilco's Nels Cline Wants You to Play Guitar

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Nels Cline, guitarist for the band Wilco, talks about his work with Guitar Mash and the need for music education in schools.

Guests:

Nels Cline
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Comments [4]

Liz

I LOVE Nels Cline's message that music making is our birthright! Not all kids need to be Jorma Kaukonan or Chet Atkins, but they can all feel the joy and release that singing, strumming, drumming etc. can bring. They are all born with the capacity to be competent musicians, all they need is the opportunity! Music in the schools is crucial!

Nov. 14 2013 12:07 PM
jgarbuz from Queens

Hendrix was WAY overrated! He was more of a stage presence and performer than any kind of truly great guitar player. Let's see how impressive he would have been on a plain acoustic guitar. But he did push forward all those electrified sounds which changed the sounds of rock n' roll for many decades.

Nov. 14 2013 11:57 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

Hendrix was WAY overrated! He was more of a stage presence and performer than any kind of truly great guitar player. Let's see how impressive he would have been on a plain acoustic guitar. But he did push forward all those electrified sounds which changed the sounds of rock n' roll for many decades.

Nov. 14 2013 11:56 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

Guitar is one of the easiest instruments to learn at a superficial level, but one of the most difficult to master as a classical instrument. My favorite guitarist of all times was Chet Atkins, who I think was the greatest guitarist of the 20th centtury. Not only could he play ANYTHING, he could do things with the guitar that no one could even imagine doing.
Most rock n' roll guitarists don't impress me even if I love the music itself. If you want to hear true god-like guitar mastery, you have to become acquainted with Chet Atkins.

Nov. 14 2013 11:47 AM

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