Streams

What Would a Tenement Museum Look Like in 2064?

Monday, August 11, 2014

A protected tenement in the new East Village Historic District. A protected tenement in the new East Village Historic District. (Stephen Nessen/WNYC)

If a tenement museum were to open in 50 years in New York City, what would it look like and what it would say about the politics of housing for immigrants? Annie Polland, the Senior Vice President for Programs & Education at the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, imagines the future of housing for the poor and she discusses the politics and history of housing and social services for poor immigrants in New York.

 

Guests:

Annie Polland

Comments [11]

Bearleader Chronicle from New York / London

The Tenement Museum is a great way to see how immigrant New Yorkers used to live. Worth a visit ... We took a tour there recently and produced a photo essay for our readers. http://bearleaderchronicle.com/site/entry_008/

Aug. 12 2014 02:40 AM
JFreely from NYC

Agreeing with Capper and Uncle Leo about removing the comments about the guest's vocal fry. This girl made the choice to speak like that. And to be a "girl" and not a "woman." It would help her to hear what we're all saying so she will remember to speak in her higher register and be an adult professional next time. In the meantime considering so many of us are commenting I think it's high time we get a segment on Vocal Fry from Lopate or Lehrer...

Aug. 11 2014 05:18 PM
JFreely from NYC

Agreeing with Capper and Uncle Leo about removing the comments about the guest's vocal fry. This girl made the choice to speak like that. And to be a "girl" and not a "woman." It would help her to hear what we're all saying so she will remember to speak in her higher register and be an adult professional next time. In the meantime considering so many of us are commenting I think it's high time we get a segment on Vocal Fry from Lopate or Lehrer...

Aug. 11 2014 05:17 PM
Capper from NYC

I am sorry that you removed the comments regarding the guests vocal fry. That was a learning experience for me.

Aug. 11 2014 02:49 PM
Tony from Canarsie

Speaking of Italian immigration in the 1880's, I've read that the majority of Italians eventually returned to their home provinces. Having been to Italy, I can understand why.

Also, in the early 1980's I lived in a tenement apartment on Eldridge Street between Hester and Grand Streets -- $120 a month -- with a bathtub in the kitchen.

Aug. 11 2014 02:01 PM
Uncle Leo from Queens

Dear Moderator:

When you remove comments from listeners about the quality of the segment, you are not only censoring the listenership but also depriving the producers of crucial information that could improve the Lopate Show.

Thank you.

L

Aug. 11 2014 02:00 PM
Steve from NYC

Mr. Lopate asked what the $12 per month rent in the 1880s would be the equivalent of today.
Most money conversion sites suggest a 20-30X conversion factor. However, many workers at that time made $1 or less per day and usually worked six days per week so for many $12 was the equivalent of two weeks wages.

Aug. 11 2014 01:57 PM
Deborah from Hudson Valley

The tenements today are in our small Hudson River towns where immigrants can still afford to rent apartments. The city is too expensive today for anyone. Our small towns are currently full of recent immigrants. Poor people have been pushed out of the city.

Aug. 11 2014 01:47 PM
antonio from antonio

Are there two or more classes or grades of tenements? I ask because I grew up in one on 50th and 9th avenue, and it appeared my apartment was once a part of a larger one. There was even a mantel; so I assume a fireplace at one time. We also had our bathroom in the unit. This is different then the ones on tenth ave, which all were railroad style and had outdoor bathrooms...

Aug. 11 2014 01:44 PM
jgarbuz from Queens

It would look like the housing projects. Not so bad.

Aug. 11 2014 01:18 PM
Pat Porter from Norwalk, CT

If Walmart pays it's employees more, then the cost will be passed on to customers. To the extent that Walmart is serving the the lower end of the economy, they would be the very people most impacted by raising those wages. It's a very complicated issue, but we cannot eliminate food stamps without a viable alternative for the people current depending on them…unless we're ready to accept a dramatic increase in starvation and diseases coming from undernourishment.

Aug. 11 2014 11:14 AM

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