Streams

Trying to Control Ebola, By Any Means Necessary

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Health officials have taken up a "cordoning" tactic not used in almost a century to try and isolate the Ebola outbreak. We discuss the latest news and the history of fighting plagues such as this with New York Times science reporter Donald G. McNeil, Jr.

Guests:

Donald G. McNeil, Jr.

Comments [5]

Sandra from Brooklyn. NY

While it may be tbe culture of some African nations to wash the bodies of the dead....this has probably become the deadly practice that can/ is spread the disease. What happens to the water and cloths used to clean the body. This is spreading the disease ....does burying the body contaminate the ground and water supply? This practice should be stopped.

Aug. 14 2014 11:38 AM
Amy from Manhattan

Isn't the biggest risk w/a cordon sanitaire that it traps people--usually the majority--who don't have the disease yet w/people they could catch it from?

Aug. 14 2014 11:28 AM
Janet Goldner from New York City

While Mr McNeil may be knowledgeable about science, certainly you could find a guest who has knowledge of West Africa. His flippant answers and mis-information about West Africa are as dangerous as Ebola. Just longer term. Please stop adding to the mis-information about West Africa!

Aug. 14 2014 11:20 AM
Estelle from Brooklyn

Camus's novel "The Plague" describes a quarantined city, Oran, during the 1940's.

Aug. 14 2014 11:18 AM
Estelle from Brooklyn

Camus's novel "The Plague" describes a quarantined city, Oran, during the 1940's.

Aug. 14 2014 11:17 AM

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