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From Tiananmen Square to Times Square, One Chinese Dissident Keeps Fighting for Democracy

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

Wang Jun Tao., a Chinese activist and student leader from the Tiananmen Square protests. Wang was given asylum in New York in 1994 and is unable to return to China. (Stephen Nessen/WNYC)

This week is the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square Massacre, when Chinese troops opened fire on students and citizens protesting for democratic reforms and rights. Many leaders of that movement were jailed and later fled the country. One of them, Wang Juntao, has been living in the U.S. since 1994 and now lives in Flushing, Queens.

He calls himself a "professional revolutionary" and continues to fight for democracy in China.

Chinese activists led by Wang Juntao protesting in Times Square, a weekly ritual for this group who call for Democratic reforms in China. (Stephen Nessen/WNYC)

On the first floor of an office in Flushing, Queens, dissidents' photos line the walls of Wang Juntao's Democratic Party of China headquarters. They include Nobel Prize winner Liu Xiaobo and artist Ai Weiwei. (Stephen Nessen/WNYC)

Wang Juntao hopes to return to China someday, to lead the country toward Democracy. (Stephen Nessen/WNYC)


 

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Comments [1]

Kenneth Bennett Lane, Lake Hiawatha, NJ from Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute, Boonton, NJ

TIANANMEN SQUARE and all other massive rallies to convey with authority the unrighteousness of a governing body do energize the populace to reevaluate the political scenario. Whatever one says or does nowadays is taken as if much thought and conscience deliberating was involved. Too much of what has to be done is simply avoided or rebuked. Civilization requires a sense of common good and search for ways to improve the common lot. Greed accomplishes distrust, even hatred, makes cooperation difficult if not impossible. I remember singing in Europe in the 1960s how deep was the hatred of the Germans, even more than 15 years after the second World War. We sense, no know,what many in our country feel about our own internal struggles.

Jul. 02 2014 08:10 PM

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