Internet Privacy, A Hockey Victory Off the Ice, Race and The American Jury

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Coming up on today's show:

  • Congress is prepared to overturn broadband privacy rules that would have required Internet Service Providers to ask permission to collect, use, and sell personal user information. Dallas Harris, a policy fellow at the non-profit Public Knowledge, explains. 
  • Phillip Martin, a senior reporter at Takeaway co-producer WGBH, traveled to Belfast, Northern Ireland, and Dublin, Ireland, to look at divisions and cooperation between the two Irish entities that were once separated by a hard border. Now, with Great Britain’s divorce from the European Union, there is growing anxiety in Ireland that the border will once again be a point of separation.
  • The U.S. Women's National Hockey Team threatened to boycott the World Championships over unfair pay and treatment, but the sport's national governing body was able to reach an agreement with the team on Tuesday night. Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson, a player for the U.S. Women's National Hockey, weighs in.  
  • Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation magazine and host of "The Edge of Sports" podcast, explains how the NCAA is exploiting student-athletes, especially Division I basketball players during March Madness. He argues that the players should strike at the Final Four in order to force a change to how they're treated. 
  • The Supreme Court recently ruled that evidence of a racially- or ethnically-biased jury can cause a verdict to be thrown out. Paul Butler, a law professor and former federal prosecutor, says we should turn to the power of individual jurors to send an important message about an unequal system.
  • Why aren't jurors paid more? Are jury trials really better than getting a verdict from a judge? How does someone get excused from jury duty? Andrew Ferguson, a law professor at the UDC David A. Clarke School of Law and author of "Why Jury Duty Matters," answers these questions and more.