Travel Ban Rejected, Presidential Ethics, Getting By on Your Parents' Jobs

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Coming up on today's show:

The 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals rejected President Trump's ban on travel to the United States by people from seven largely Muslim countries. Leon Fresco, former head immigration lawyer in the Obama Justice Department, joins us to talk about the ruling.

We asked if your parents' livelihoods would be feasible for you, today, in 2017 America. Your responses gave us a look at the current state of the economy for working people.

Donald Trump tweeted his anger at the department-store chain Nordstrom this week, claiming they mistreated his daughter when they stopped selling her fashion line. His adviser Kellyanne Conway followed up on that by overtly telling people to buy her products in what seems like a clear violation of government ethics laws. Kathleen Clark, professor of law at Washington University in St. Louis, joined us to explain the week in ethics issues.

Japan prime minister Shinzo Abe is set to visit the United States for a summit with President Trump. But instead of coming to the White House, Abe will stay at Mar-A-Lago, Trump's private club and hotel in South Florida. Jim Schoff, a former senior adviser for East Asia policy in the Department of Defense, will talk to us about the nature of the United States-Japan relationship. 

Every Friday, Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, drops by to review the new releases hitting the box office. This week, he looks at "Fifty Shades Darker," sequel to the box-office hit "Fifty Shades of Grey," as well as "John Wick: Chapter 2" and "The LEGO Batman Movie." 

Translating a president's words to another language is always a tricky affair. President Donald Trump's syntax and word choices present some of their own challenges. David Bellos, director of the Program in Translation and Intercultural Communication at Princeton University, goes over some of the unique issues translators face. 

The Canadian province of Manitoba, which shares borders with North Dakota and Minnesota, has become a hotspot destination for an increasing number of asylum seekers fleeing from the United States to cross the border by foot. Many risk their lives at this time of year so they can appeal for asylum in Canada, rather than the US.