Travel Ban Questions Answered, Protests in Romania, The History of Today's Divide

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Oral arguments will be heard over President Trump's executive order on immigration at the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco.
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Coming up on today's show:

  • The Obama administration's top immigration lawyer, Leon Fresco, answers listener questions about the current status of the Trump administration's travel ban. The case is now in the hands of the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals, where a three-judge panel will decide whether to restore the ban that had been temporarily halted by a lower federal court. 
  • Daniella Levine Cava, one of the commissioners of Miami-Dade County, joints us to discuss the implications of the decision by mayor Carlos Gimenez to cooperate with the Trump administration's executive order directing cities and counties to detain people based on immigration status, a federal concern. Not everyone in the combined city-county government thinks that move was necessary.
  •  A man exonerated after spending 27 years in prison for a crime he didn't commit got out of prison and was sent to an immigration detention facility. Now Jules Letemps faces deportation to Haiti, a country he fled in 1981, because of a minor drug offense in his past. Reporter Christie Thompson of The Marshall Project discusses his case.
  • Betsy DeVos faces strong opposition in the Senate to her nomination as Education Secretary, and Vice President Mike Pence is expected to be needed to break a tie to confirm her. The Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the latest from the Senate.  
  • In the first weeks of his presidency, Donald Trump has mostly focused on policies concerning Europe and the Middle East. Notably absent from the list has been China. Orville Schell, director of the Asia Society's Center on US-China relations, assesses the state of US-China relations. 
  • Author Nicholas Guyatt has a new way of looking at how the history of segregation informs current divisions in American society, including analogies that can be drawn from the very first attempt to solve America's racial problems.