DAPL's Next Steps, Executions in Georgia, Norman Lear

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Norman Lear
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Coming up on today's show:

  • A mistrial was declared yesterday in the police shooting death of Walter Scott, an unarmed African-American man whose shooting and subsequent death was captured on both police car dash camera and cellphone video as he ran from an officer following a traffic stop for a non-working tail light. Philip Stinson, a criminologist, former police officer, and associate professor at Bowling Green State University, has the details on what's next. 
  • As Standing Rock protesters and tribal leaders celebrate a victory over the Dakota Access Pipeline, supporters of the pipeline are looking forward. Craig Stevens, spokesperson for the Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure Now, which supports the pipeline, joins us to discuss what he expects will happen going forward.
  • A settlement has been reached in a class action lawsuit filed by a group of mentally ill prisoners against federal prison officials at ADX-Florence. The Marshall Project's Andrew Cohen and Dr. Terry Kupers, institute professor at the Wright Institute in Oakland, explain.
  • An electronic music party at an Oakland warehouse ended in tragedy last Friday night after a fire spread through a live/work space for artists. Now, the incident is reinvigorating the debate over building safety. Cy Musiker, reporter and host of "To Do List" from KQED, shares his report from Northern California.
  • The state of Georgia is set to execute William Sallie tomorrow. Sallie was convicted for murder in 1990, and missed a federal review of his sentence by eight days, in part the result of his lack of counsel following his sentencing. His execution will be Georgia’s ninth in 2016, the most of any state this year. Rhonda Cook, staff writer for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, weighs in. 
  • American rapper, singer, and writer Dessa Darling first got her start with spoken word poetry while studying philosophy at the University of Minnesota. She’s been described as "Mos Def meets Dorothy Parker," and joins The Takeaway to discuss her new single and creative process.
  • In part two of our series on black representation in entertainment, we speak with longtime television writer and producer Norman Lear about the early genesis of African-American representation in sitcoms.