A City Without Hospitals, Divided States, Black Lives Move Forward

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Jerry Lambert, left, a supporter of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, and Asa Khalif with Black Lives Matter scuffle, after Khalif took Lambert's sign, outside the location where Trump i
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  • The last functioning hospitals in the rebel-held side of Aleppo have been destroyed by government strikes. What is the future of those who remain trapped in the besieged city?  Dr. Rola Hallam is a British-Syrian doctor and CEO and Founder of Can-Do, a new start up providing medical and humanitarian aid to the people of Syria. 
  • The North Carolina governorship still hasn't been called, with Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper’s lead growing to about 6,600 votes over incumbent Republican Governor Pat McCrory. If the margin remains below 10,000 votes, McCrory can call for a recount. Jeff Tiberii, Capitol Bureau Chief for North Carolina Public Radio, reports.
  • Adding to their gains in 2014, Republicans picked up five state House chambers and two state Senate chambers in the election.  David Daley, former editor in chief of Salon, explores how Republicans have been so successful at the state level and what the long term future for Democrats in the states is.
  • After a referendum in Colombia voted down a peace deal, today top leaders of the FARC in Bogota are expected to sign a new peace agreement with the government. Colombia's president Juan Manuel Santos won the Nobel Peace Prize last month for his efforts to end the war. The agreement will have to be signed, and then will likely go to Congress to debate and ratify the agreement.
  • As South Koreans call for the impeachment of President Park, gender has surfaced as a crucial factor in her presidency. Women’s groups protested her candidacy when she was elected as the country’s first female president in 2013, saying that a daughter of a dictator could not represent real women, and they now fear that the scandal will make sexism worse in a country with deeply entrenched gender inequality.  Contributing editor for The New Republic Suki Kim weighs in.
  • On the Native American reservations of northern Minnesota, cycles drug abuse and gang violence can be hard to break out of. Native American filmmaker and Executive Producer Chris Eyre teams up with Director Jack Riccobono to share the story of a gang leader and his protege in the new documentary, "The Seventh Fire."
  • The Black Lives Matter movement was born under an Obama presidency, but its supporters argue that it's more important now than ever before.  Opal Tometi, co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement, discusses what the next four years of the Black Lives Matter movement will look like in America.