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Multi-tasking, Measuring, Progressive Politics

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Monday, August 18, 2014

New research into the cognitive neuroscience of attention and memory can be applied to our daily lives to help us better organize our homes, workflow, and time. New research into the cognitive neuroscience of attention and memory can be applied to our daily lives to help us better organize our homes, workflow, and time. (Copyright: Lightspring/Shutterstock)

On today’s show: We’ll find out how new research into attention and memory can help us multi-task and to better manage our time at home and at work! Mark Kurlansky and his daughter Talia Kurlansky talk about their weekly ritual of cooking recipes from around the world. Most of the rest of the world uses the metric system, and in the 1970s, the US seemed ready to make the switch and give up our odd system of measurement. We’ll find out why we never did. And how Teddy Roosevelt helped create the progressive movement and redefined modern American politics.

How to Multi-Task and Better Manage Your Time at Home and at Work

A psychologist and neuroscientist explains how new research into attention and memory can help us navigate information overload.

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Travel the World in Your Kitchen

Mark Kurlansky and his daughter Talia share their tradition of cooking international recipes from around the world.

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The Smear Campaign that Kept Us Off the Metric System

For a time in the 1970s, America seemed ready to make the switch. Then certain powers that be scared us into sticking with our own confusing system.

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How Theodore Roosevelt Helped Create Progressive Politics

A look at the power struggle that created the progressive movement and defined modern American politics at the turn of the 20th century.

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Recipe: Mark and Talia Kurlansky's Haitian Blanc Manger Mamiche

An old French recipe adopted by wealthy Haitians nationwide.

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Recipe: Mark and Talia Kurlansky Haitian Griyo de Porc

Pork used to be the most common meat in Haiti. This recipe is adapted from the traditional one that calls for "Creole pig."

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Recipe: Mark and Talia Kurlansky's Haitian Grilled Octopus

Talia's tips for this recipe: This octopus dish was thoroughly delicious. However, for it to be edible you have to make the octopus tender. You simply boil a pot of hot water and place the octopus inside, then you take the octopus out, cool it, poke it, and see if it’s tender enough to stick a fork through its body. The routine goes like this: boil then cool, boil then cool.

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