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Crime, Suffering, Tragedy and John Lithgow

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Friday, August 08, 2014

John Lithgow, Annette Bening, and Christopher Innvar inThe Public Theater’s free Shakespeare in the Park production of King Lear, directed by Daniel Sullivan, July 22-August 17, 2014. John Lithgow, Annette Bening, and Christopher Innvar inThe Public Theater’s free Shakespeare in the Park production of King Lear, directed by Daniel Sullivan, July 22-August 17, 2014. (Joan Marcus/The Public Theater)

New Yorker staff writer Nicholas Schmidle looks into whether the Chicago police coerced witnesses into implicating a man for a murder he didn’t commit. John Lithgow talks about playing King Lear in the Public Theater’s Shakespeare in the Park production. Jo Nesbø talks about his latest crime thriller, The Son. Plus, this week’s Please Explain is all about the ebola virus and other infectious disease outbreaks, and how they’re treated, contained, and brought under control.

Did Chicago Police Coerce Witnesses?

New Yorker staff writer Nicholas Schmidle looks into whether the Chicago police coerced witnesses into implicating a man for a murder he didn’t commit.

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John Lithgow Wrestles with Rage, Revenge, Raccoons as King Lear

The actor discusses playing the tragic king in The Public Theater’s Shakespeare in the Park production.

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Jo Nesbø, Master of the Crime Thriller

Crime thriller master Jo Nesbø discusses his latest novel, The Son, which is set inside Oslo’s maze of especially venal, high-level corruption. It tells the story of Sonny Lofthus, who has been in prison for a dozen years, nurturing a serious heroin habit, serving time ...

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How to Contain and Control the Ebola Outbreak

West Africa is in the midst of the largest Ebola outbreak ever recorded. For this week's Please Explain, an infectious disease expert talks about where it comes from, how it spreads, and how it can be contained.

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