Streams

Growing Good Eaters

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Wednesday, July 16, 2014

kid eating spaghetti kids food Don't let your kids ruin your love of good food. You can teach them to love good food, too. (Copyright: Purple Queue/Shutterstock)

Dan Pashman, host of “The Sporkful,” and Hillary Frank, host of “The Longest Shortest Time,” share tips on what to feed kids and how to raise adventurous eaters. We’ll learn about the adventures of five Frenchmen who sought refuge in America during the French Revolution, and the ways they helped shape American history. Elizabeth Mitchell tells the story of the visionary French sculptor who designed the Statue of Liberty and brought it to New York. Plus, our word maven Patricia T. O’Conner talks about words from WWI and she answers listener questions about language and grammar!

There's Nothing Gross about Eating Your Kids' Chewed-up Meatloaf

Dan Pashman, host of The Sporkful, and Hillary Frank, host of The Longest Shortest Time, discuss how to eat well  or try to — while parenting. Plus, Leonard declares a winner in Hillary & Dan's great graham cracker debate.

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Five Men Fled the French Revolution - and Ended Up Shaping America

Francois Furstenberg writes about five Frenchmen who played key roles in American diplomacy during the tumultuous first years of the United States.

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The Statue of Liberty Was One Man's Quixotic Pet Project

 For decades, the myth has persisted that the Statue of Liberty was a grand gift from France, but Elizabeth Mitchell reveals that the statue was in fact the pet project of one quixotic and visionary French sculptor, Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi.

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The War That Gave Us 'Cooties'

Patricia T. O’Conner looks at the words invented during World War I—like blimp, doughboy, even cooties.

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James MacGregor Burns, left, at Williams College

Tribute: James MacGregor Burns

James MacGregor Burns was one of our country’s most important political historians. He won the Pulitzer for his book on Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1970, and spent his life writing about the nature of leadership in general, and the presidency in particular. He died at the age of 95. But you can still hear Leonard’s interview with him from 2003.

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