Streams

Economics and Government, Poetry and Politics

« previous episode | next episode »

Monday, June 09, 2014

Paris Paris (Antonio Ponte/flickr)

On today’s show: two editors at The Economist explain why we need to reimagine  the role of government. We’ll get a preview of Poets House’s annual Bridgewalk, where poets walk across the Brooklyn Bridge, reciting poems about New York along the way. Cristina Henriquez talks about her new novel, The Book of Unknown Americans. And we’ll find out why the French intelligentsia turned toward militarism and xenophobia in the decades leading up to World War II.

The Global Race to Reinvent the State

The long-term success of the United States depends on our ability to reinvent the state, but, according to two editors of The Economist, we're is failing at that task.

Comments [20]

The Annual Poets House’s Bridgewalk

A celebratory procession and poetry reading from atop one of New York's greatest monuments.

Comments [5]

The Book of Unknown Americans, a Novel by Cristina Henriquez

Cristina Henriquez talks about her novel The Book of Unknown Americans, about a boy and a girl who fall in love, and two families whose hopes collide with destiny. Arturo and Alma Rivera have lived their whole lives in Mexico. One day, their 15-year-old daughter, Maribel, is terribly injured, and they doubt that she’ll ever be the same. And so, leaving all they have behind, the Riveras come to America with a single dream: that in this country of great opportunity and resources, Maribel can get better.

Comment

The Embrace of Unreason in France Leading Up to WWII

Frederick Brown tells the story of France in the decades leading up to World War II. The Embrace of Unreason: France 1914-1940 shows through how the French intelligentsia turned away from the humanistic traditions and ideals of the Enlightenment in favor of submission to authority, patriotism, militarism, and xenophobia. Brown sees the Paris World’s Fair of 1937 as the  perfect representation of Europe’s cultural doomsday, featuring two enormous pavilions, the first built by Nazi Germany, the second by Soviet Russia.

Comments [5]

Lopate's Conversations with Tony Winners Audra McDonald, Neil Patrick Harris & more

Leonard Lopate's conversations with the actors and directors who took home the night's biggest awards.

Comments [1]

Get the WNYC Morning Brief in your inbox.
We'll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.