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Lasting Effects: Government Spying, Creating Art, PTSD

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Monday, May 12, 2014

Kara Walker Kara Walker, A Subtlety, 2014. (Photography by Jason Wyche, Courtesy Creative Time, 2014./Creative Time)

Investigative filmmaker Michael Kirk reveals the inside story of how the government came to spy on millions of Americans since September 11, 2001, and the lengths the government has gone to to keep the program a secret. Kara Walker talks about her new public sculpture at the old Domino Sugar factory in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Director Nabil Ayouch tells us about his film “Horses of God,” which is set in the slums of the outskirts of Casablanca and is based on a horrific 2003 bombing. Ron Capps, who served as a military intelligence officer and as a diplomat for the U.S. Department of State, explains how witnessing war crimes, ethnic cleansing, and genocide caused him to develop PTSD.

How the Government Came to Spy on Millions of Americans

The secret history of the surveillance program began after 9/11—and the lengths the government has gone to to keep the program secret.

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Kara Walker at the Domino Sugar Factory

The artist's new work, A Subtlety, explores the history of sugar and its many implications on race, sexual discrimination and power.

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“Horses of God” and the Making of Suicide Bombers

A drama set in the slums on the outskirts of Casablanca, based on a horrific 2003 bombing.

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Seriously Not All Right

A senior military intelligence officer and Foreign Service officer for the U.S. Department of State developed PTSD after witnessing war crimes adn genocide around the world.

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Guest Picks: Kara Walker

Artist Kara Walker talked about her sculpture installation in the Domino Sugar factory in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. She shared a few of her favorite things with us.

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