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DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz; James Franco; Amy Grace Loyd's The Affairs of Others; Life in the Age of Apps

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Monday, October 14, 2013

Florida Congresswoman and Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz talks about the challenges facing America and Congress. Actor James Franco talks about his acting and directing career, his debut novel, Actors Anonymous, and his latest film based on Faulkner’s As I Lay DyingAmy Grace Loyd discusses her new novel, The Affairs of Others. Howard Gardner on why our reliance on smart gadgets may rob us of a sense of identity and even stunt our imaginations.

Debbie Wasserman Schultz's Parental Perspective on Politics

Congresswoman and Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz talks about the challenges facing America and how they will affect future generations. For the Next Generation: A Wake-Up Call to Solving Our Nation’s Problems  discusses how important issues have been sidelined by gridlock in a Congress that is too concerned about the next election to worry about the future, and how the group of Americans who have the most to lose from this dysfunction are the ones least represented in government: America’s children. For the Next Generation is a call to action, one mother’s challenge to her congressional colleagues and to the rest of the nation, to adopt a parent’s perspective for doing right by kids.

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James Franco's Debut Novel

James Franco talks about his acting and directing career, as well as his debut novel, Actors Anonymous. Loosely modeled on Alcoholics Anonymous’s Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions, the book is an intense, wild ride into the dark heart of celebrity. He'll also discuss his latest film based on Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying.

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The Affairs of Others

Amy Grace Loyd  discusses her novel, The Affairs of Others, about a young woman, haunted by loss, who rediscovers passion and possibility when she’s drawn into the tangled lives of her neighbors.

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The App Generation

Howard Gardner talks about what it means to be “app-dependent” versus “app-enabled” and how life for the younger generation differs from life before the digital era. The App Generation: How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy, and Imagination in a Digital World discusses the drawbacks of apps – that they may foreclose a sense of identity, encourage superficial relations with others, and stunt creative imagination – as well as their benefits – that they can promote a strong sense of identity, allow deep relationships, and stimulate creativity. 

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