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Director Mike Nichols on "Betrayal"; the Harlem Renaissance; NY Film Festival at 50; Richard Dawkins

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Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Rachel Weisz, Daniel Craig, and Rafe Spall in hehearsal for Harold Pinter's 'Betrayal,' directed by MIke Nichols Rachel Weisz, Daniel Craig, and Rafe Spall in hehearsal for Harold Pinter's "Betrayal," directed by MIke Nichols. Opens Oct. 27 at the Barrymore Theater. (Photo by Brigitte Lacombe/Boneau/Bryan-Brown)

Mike Nichols talks about directing the upcoming Broadway revival of Harold Pinter’s play, “Betrayal.” We’ll take a look at the white women who became part of the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s. We’ll get a preview of this year’s New York Film Festival, which is marking its 50th anniversary. Richard Dawkins talks about his early life, of becoming a scientist and writing The Selfish Gene.

Mike Nichols on "Betrayal"

"I think that to make something alive, instead of on a page, is an honorable task. And it turns me on."

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The White Women of the Black Renaissance

Carla Kaplan discusses the white women who became Harlem Renaissance insiders. Miss Anne in Harlem: The White Women of the Black Renaissance focuses on six of the unconventional, free-thinking women, some from Manhattan high society, many Jewish, who crossed race lines and defied social conventions to become a part of the culture and heartbeat of Harlem in the 1920s.

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51 Years of the New York Film Festival

Kent Jones, director of programming for the New York Film Festival, discusses what’s in store for the festival this year. He also talks about the new book, New York Film Festival Gold: A 50th Anniversary Celebration that celebrates the past five decades of cinema and the New York Film Festival.

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Richard Dawkins and the Making of a Scientist

Evolutionary biologist and famous atheist Richard Dawkins discusses his childhood, his intellectual development, and the story of how he came to write The Selfish Gene, considered by many to be one of the most important books of the 20th century. His first memoir, An Appetite for Wonder: The Making of a Scientist is about his childhood in colonial Africa, the beginning of his career as a skeptic in boarding school by refusing to kneel for prayer in chapel, and his intellectual awakening at Oxford.

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Guest Picks: Kent Jones

Kent Jones, the director of programming for the New York Film Festival, was on the Leonard Lopate Show to talk about this year's festival. He also told us what he's a fan of and revealed his (noncommittal) comfort food. 

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