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Teachers strike, Rudolph Bing and Met Opera

Sunday, September 15, 1968

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Update on the education crisis. Mayor Lindsay describes the state of events and gives some background: the Board of Education has ordered schools to open, however the teachers union has told teachers to not report to schools. Dispute stems from the Ocean Hill-Brownsville School District in Brooklyn. The local board transferred ten teachers out of the district last May. The board argued that they should be able to decide they did not want these particular teachers in their schools, the United Federation of Teachers' argued that the board did not have the right to make such a decision. Eventually, with the approval of Lindsay the teachers were returned to their positions with police escorts. He states that any decentralization plan must protect the rights of teachers and parents. Lindsay references the United Federation of Teachers' plan to strike the following day at City Hall. It was stated that it may be the longest strike in history. Lindsay calls for both sides to seek a compromise.

Lindsay then introduce Rudolph Bing, general manager of the Metropolitan Opera.
They discuss how Bing decides on the season's performances.


Audio courtesy of the NYC Municipal Archives WNYC Collection


WNYC archives id: 8325

Contributors:

Rudolph Bing and John V. Lindsay

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About This Week with Mayor Lindsay

With sensible flair, Mayor John Lindsay addresses concerns about municipal issues (1968). 

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