Talking Politics At Work

Email a Friend
It might be impossible to get through this seemingly eternal election cycle without bringing up politics at work. But is it really a good idea?

The presidential election is dominating the news and conversations — even if people say they are tired of talking about what feels like an endless campaign.

But there is one place that's free of politics: the office.

Yeah, right. That's probably what you hope for because who wants to argue with their coworkers? In reality, though, you've probably heard someone talking about the latest debate just before a meeting starts or walked into the break room as people were talking about what's in the latest batch of hacked emails.

So if you are just dying to bring up this year's presidential campaign, how do you do it?

"I think the most important thing, first of all, is to look for and watch for the signs of people who are interested and willing to exchange in talking about politics," said Liane Davey, co-founder of 3COze Inc which works with corporate teams.

"If you start to broach it or someone else broaches it and they drop their eye contact or look at their phone, that’s a good sign that they are not comfortable."

Davey spoke to Money Talking host Charlie Herman about some of the dos and don'ts when it comes to talking about politics at work (that's the presidential kind) and provided some specific steps for the Harvard Business Review.

Music Playlist

  1. Now Son

    Artist: Podington Bear
    Album: Upbeat