The Takeaway Christmas Special: Stories About Giving

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Happy Holidays from The Takeaway!
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Merry Christmas from The Takeaway! In honor of the holiday season, we're spending the day thinking about giving. Here, you'll get an hour packed with thoughtful conversations that highlight the power of giving through poetry, music, laughter, and even technology. This Christmas you'll hear from:

  • Marian Stern, adjunct assistant professor at New York University in the School of Professional Studies. Though everyone is encouraged to be charitable, Stern explains that the very wealthy are being criticized for who they choose to give their money to. She explores the history of power and big gifts, and how they shape the American confidence in charity. 
  • Kevin Sylvester and Wilner Baptiste go by the stage names of Kev Marcus and Wil B. They are the only two members of Black Violin, an unconventional hip-hop group that incorporates witty rap and classical music. They explain how the violin has given them the opportunity to break the mold in music.
  • What's on your Christmas list? Robot drones are this year's must-have toy—according to the Federal Aviation Administration, about a million drones may be sold during the 2015 holiday season. How will the drone revolution effect the holiday? Today in a short radio drama, The Takeaway imagines what would happen if drones replaced Santa’s reindeer. Congressman Peter DeFazio (D-Oregon) also explains how the U.S. government is preparing for the drone revolution.
  • Katy Sewall, a senior producer at Seattle public radio station KUOW and host of The Bittersweet Life podcast, met an 8-year-old girl named Gabi Mann this year. Gabi has received dozens of shiny, sparkly gifts from crows over the past four years. Sewall shares what she learned about this extraordinary girl and her crow friends with The Takeaway.

  • As we close out our Christmas special, we hear from America's poet laureate, Juan Felipe Herrera. He discusses the giving power of poetry and the importance of using language to name history.