Streams

Supreme Court Takes Middle Ground On Restitution For Victims Of Child Porn

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

The Supreme Court on Wednesday said a federal law limits how much money victims of child pornography can recover from people who viewed their images online, throwing out a nearly $3.4 million judgment in favor of a woman whose childhood rape has been widely seen on the Internet. Two dissenting justices called on Congress to change the law to benefit victims.

The justices said in a 5-4 ruling that courts can order people convicted of child pornography to pay restitution to their victims, but only to the extent that there is a strong tie between the victim’s losses and the convicts’ actions. In this case, Doyle Randall Paroline was held liable by a federal appeals court for the entire amount of the woman’s losses, though his computer contained just two images of her, among more than 150 illicit photographs.

The case involved a woman known in court papers by the pseudonym “Amy.” Her losses have been pegged at nearly $3.4 million, based on the ongoing Internet trade and viewing of images of her being raped by her uncle when she was 8 and 9 years old.

David Savage has been covering the case for the Los Angeles Times and joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

Guest

  • David Savage, Supreme Court correspondent for the Los Angeles Times.
Copyright 2014 WBUR-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wbur.org.

Source: NPR

Tags:

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.

Get the WNYC Morning Brief in your inbox.
We'll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.