Streams

Stretch of 1st Avenue Repaved with New Asphalt

Tuesday, October 15, 2013 - 06:28 PM

A large stretch of 1st avenue has been re-paved using asphalt the Department of Transportation says is more durable and easier to maintain. Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan says the roadway was originally paved with 18-inches of concrete 30 years ago, which was more cost-effective at the time, back in 1983.

But over the years, the roadway deteriorated. "It was in very bad shape," Sadik-Khan said. "You could see, it looked like the surface of the moon in some parts of it. And it was difficult to maintain because of the concrete, and it has really shown its age."

Sadik-Khan said the new surface is a one-inch layer of asphalt made from a special polymer. It cost the city $7 million to repave the roadway.

Editors:

Julianne Welby

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Comments [2]

Bronxite from NYC

According to the DOT: after the installation of the protected bicycle lane, pedestrian refuges, new signage, signalling and lane reduction; injuries from collisions were reduced by nearly 37% along with improved traffic flow.

Oct. 17 2013 12:26 AM
NYCycler from NYC

What we won't hear about from DOT is about how much "safer" First Avenue on the UES and E Harlem is after replacing the older, traditional non-segregated bike lanes with DOT's segregated "protected" lanes.

Why? Because it's not. Here, the numbers would clearly show that the new "infrastructure" is no better than the old. So, mum's the word on this...

Oct. 16 2013 09:58 AM

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