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NYC's "Horror Show" Streetlights to be Replaced

Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 04:03 PM

Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Transportation Commissioner Janet Sadik-Khan show the new LED fixture that will go into the 'cobra-head' streetlights around the city. (Fred Mogul/WNYC)

The yellow-tinted streetlights gracing much of New York may cast Halloween-appropriate lighting, but the city will be jettisoning them in favor of brighter, more energy-efficient bulbs.

City officials announced Thursday that light-emitting diodes will replace the bulbs currently in some 250,000 streetlights that shine down on roads, highways, bridges, sidewalks and park trails. The four-year-long project will cost $79 million and save an estimated $14 million in maintenance costs and energy use -- making the decision to retrofit, as Mayor Michael Bloomberg put it, a "no-brainer."

Plus the new bulbs will be an aesthetic improvement over "the yellowish almost horror-movie-like light (emitted) from the current high-pressure sodium lighting that we use now," said DOT head Janette Sadik-Khan. 

The new LED bulbs have already gone into most traffic and many pedestrian crossing signals and are in the historic reproduction lights lining Central Park walkways and much of the Eastern Parkway median. They also hang on the 'necklaces' above the Brooklyn Bridge and are being phased into the other East River crossings, too.

Bloomberg and Sadik-Khan said New York is the largest city in the United States to switch over to LED's.

The bulbs and the housings that contain them are made in North Carolina.

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Comments [2]

Frank from Bay Ridge, B'klyn

Made in America, and they'll save us money? Sounds like a win-win.

Dec. 09 2013 03:48 PM
TOM from Brooklyn

Only about $300/unit. Pretty cheap, I think. Six years to payback. Let's see if they work.

Oct. 25 2013 10:34 AM

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