Streams

Scott Stringer: Comptroller-Elect

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Scott Stringer, current Manhattan Borough President and now Comptroller-Elect, talks about his plans for the office and the challenges that lie ahead for New York City.

Guests:

Scott M. Stringer
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Comments [4]

Inquisigal from Brooklyn

Stringer's assessment of NYCHA as stepping-stone housing in today's economic climate, and the residents as those who made currently gentrifying neighborhoods "desirable" sounds quite pie-in-the-sky. While I'm sure there is a certain number of people in this situation, it seems the bulk of people who live in NYCHA housing move in and stay put. Also, having lived in currently desirable neighborhoods - before they were desirable - the poorest members of the community generally do not contribute to bettering the community due to a lack of education, general know-how, finances, and time. It's one thing to stress the need for NYCHA to continue to receive funding and to expand to provide needed housing, and more importantly, to focus on education - but to spin NYCHA in the way Stringer just did sounds ridiculous when you've lived next door to large housing projects where violence is a regular part of life, and people are focusing on the most basic needs in their lives.

Nov. 13 2013 10:58 AM
antonio from baySide

He also stood toe to toe vs. the republican nominee as well. I watched maybe the only debate between them, and he was so abrasive..

Nov. 13 2013 10:47 AM
ellen from Manhtattan

What aboaut the 91st Street MTS right behind NYCHA housing?

Nov. 13 2013 10:45 AM
Bob

"So which side are you on?" Good question, Brian. Starting with the Midtown East rezoning questions, it seems that Mr. Stringer is for/against/not sure on every issue. Can someone please tell him that the election is over and he won, so it is OK to take a position that may upset some people?

Nov. 13 2013 10:41 AM

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