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Rebecca Hall on Her Role in "Machinal"

Friday, February 07, 2014

Rebecca Hall discusses her role in the Roundabout Theatre Company’s production of Sophie Treadwell’s “Machinal.” Inspired by the infamous 1927 murder trial of Ruth Snyder, “Machinal.” Hall plays a young stenographer in the 1920s who realizes her life is nothing like she hoped it would be. She finds joy by having an illicit love affair, and she’ll go to any lengths to avoid returning to her routine existence. “Machinal” is playing at the American Airlines Theatre on Broadway. 

 

Guests:

Rebecca Hall
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Comments [7]

Wayne Johnson Ph.D. from Bk

Terrific play,beautifully staged, directed, with excellent ensemble acting.

Feb. 07 2014 01:35 PM
RUCB_Alum from Central New Jersey

No close-up of Ms. Hall! Damn!

I have thought hers the "Most Kissable Lips" since seeing her in 'Your Starter for Ten'.

BTW - The CB in RUCB is 'College Bowl'. If you've seen 'Your Starter...' you get the connection.

Feb. 07 2014 12:53 PM
bill cain

You're confusion Peter Hall and Peter Brook.

The movie you're talking about is Peter Brook.

Good show, by the way

Feb. 07 2014 12:52 PM
Jim Niesen from Brooklyn

I think Leonard is confusing Peter Hall with Peter Brook when he talks about the tightrope film

Feb. 07 2014 12:52 PM
Dan from Village

Really want to see this. A few corrections: Ruth Snyder was actually the second woman electrocuted in New York, after Martha Place, in 1899. Also, the famous photo of Ruth in the chair was taken after the current was already turned on. And the photographer, Tom Howard, is the grandfather of George Wendt (Norm from "Cheers").

Feb. 07 2014 12:50 PM
jgarbuz from Queens

Wikiedia - Ruth Snyder

"In 1925, Snyder, a housewife from Queens Village, Queens, New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. She then began to plan the murder of her husband, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. Her distaste for her husband apparently began when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home, and also named his boat after her. Guishard, whom Albert described to Ruth as "the finest woman I have ever met," had been dead for 10 years.[1]

Ruth Snyder first persuaded her husband to purchase insurance, but with the assistance of an insurance agent (who was subsequently fired and sent to prison for forgery) "signed" a $48,000 life insurance policy that paid extra ("double indemnity") if an unexpected act of violence killed the victim. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house; moreover, that the behavior of Mrs. Snyder was inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed.[citation needed]

Then, the police found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen—still in the house, but hidden. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it (it was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard), and asked Ruth about it. A flustered Ruth's mind immediately turned to her lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and she asked the detective what Judd Gray had to do with this. It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was found upstate, in Syracuse. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was caught and returned to Jamaica, Queens and charged along with Ruth Snyder. (Dorothy Parker told Oscar Levant that Gray tried to escape the police by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island, which Levant noted was "quite a long trip." According to Parker, in order "not to attract attention, he gave the driver a ten-cent tip."[2])"

Reminds me of my ex-wife I narrowly escaped, thank God!

Feb. 07 2014 12:46 PM
jgarbuz from Queens

Wikiedia - Ruth Snyder

"In 1925, Snyder, a housewife from Queens Village, Queens, New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. She then began to plan the murder of her husband, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. Her distaste for her husband apparently began when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home, and also named his boat after her. Guishard, whom Albert described to Ruth as "the finest woman I have ever met," had been dead for 10 years.[1]

Ruth Snyder first persuaded her husband to purchase insurance, but with the assistance of an insurance agent (who was subsequently fired and sent to prison for forgery) "signed" a $48,000 life insurance policy that paid extra ("double indemnity") if an unexpected act of violence killed the victim. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house; moreover, that the behavior of Mrs. Snyder was inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed.[citation needed]

Then, the police found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen—still in the house, but hidden. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it (it was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard), and asked Ruth about it. A flustered Ruth's mind immediately turned to her lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and she asked the detective what Judd Gray had to do with this. It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was found upstate, in Syracuse. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was caught and returned to Jamaica, Queens and charged along with Ruth Snyder. (Dorothy Parker told Oscar Levant that Gray tried to escape the police by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island, which Levant noted was "quite a long trip." According to Parker, in order "not to attract attention, he gave the driver a ten-cent tip."[2])"

Reminds me of my ex-wife I narrowly escaped, thank God!

Feb. 07 2014 12:46 PM

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