Presidential popularity, and how Trump stacks up

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President-elect Donald Trump speaks briefly to reporters between meetings at the Mar-a-lago Club in Palm Beach, Florida, on Dec. 28, 2016. Photo by Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

President-elect Donald Trump speaks briefly to reporters between meetings at the Mar-a-lago Club in Palm Beach, Florida, on Dec. 28, 2016. Photo by Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

After winning the election, President-elect Donald Trump’s favorability rating rose. (In Gallup polling, it jumped to 42 percent from 34 percent the week before Nov. 8). But on Monday, Gallup data indicates Mr. Trump may not be gaining ground yet when it comes to voter confidence and that he faces a gap compared to the expectations that faced his two predecessors.

Less than half, 44 percent, believe that PEOTUS will prevent major scandals in his administration. Asked the same question in 2008 and 2000, more than 70 percent of Americans felt incoming Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush would avoid scandal.

Trump campaigned strongly on protecting America, including destroying ISIS and defeating terrorism. But again less than half — 46 percent of survey respondents — believe he will be able to handle an international crisis.

In what areas are Americans confident in the president-elect? Americans have the highest confidence, 60 percent, in Trump’s ability to work effectively with Congress. That still trails Presidents Obama and George W. Bush.

But it could touch on a potential positive for the incoming new world leader. Expectations are moderate to low. Especially when compared to Bush and Obama, who entered the White House with voters feeling far more confident in their abilities, but who both saw favorability ratings drop notably their second and third years in office.

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