NPR News Nuggets: Eggtravaganza, A Job For Obama & Found Money

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People walk past the entrance of the parking garage where reporter Bob Woodward held late night meetings with Deep Throat, his Watergate source who later turned out to be Mark Felt, the FBI's former No. 2 official.
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Here's a quick roundup of some of the mini-moments you may have missed on this week's Morning Edition.

Eggcelent Island

Is there anything better than chocolate? Yes, chocolate eggs. And much to the delight of children on the German island of Langeoog, tens of thousands of these eggs washed up on the beaches. The eggs appeared to come from nowhere, but as Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep said on Monday, Deutsche Welle reported a passing cargo ship weathered a storm, sending the eggs overboard. The children were able to enjoy the chocolate and the small toys in the Kinder Surprise chocolate eggs. There was only one problem, the messages in the eggs were written in Russian.

President of playlists

By the end of next week President Obama will be finished with the job he's had for the last eight years, but luckily Spotify has the perfect post-White House job for him. As Morning Edition host Rachel Martin said on Wednesday, the job requirements include having at least eight years experience running a highly regarded nation, and the job seeker must be "one of the greatest speakers of all time." Oh and one more requirement. The applicant must have a Nobel Peace Prize. It sounds kind of perfect, right? There's no word on whether Obama is interested in submitting an application for the job, but we do know he has some experience in making playlists.

History's parking lot

If you ever wanted to be in the garage where it happened, your time is running out because it's being torn down. During the Watergate scandal that brought down President Richard Nixon, reporter Bob Woodward met with a secret source known as Deep Throat in a parking lot below an office building outside Washington D.C. But as Morning Edition host Rachel Martin said on Wednesday, that building and the lot underneath, won't be around for much longer. It's scheduled to be torn down and part of a new development project will go up. Don't worry though, history will not be erased as city leaders say the legend of Deep Throat will live on. A plaque commemorating those secret meetings will be restored once the new site is completed.

Snow me the money!!

That's what Joemel Panisa is saying now. Panisa lives in Oregon which has been hit by a tremendous amount of snow recently. As Morning Edition host Rachel Martin said, he was snowed in and killing time by cleaning out his home office when he happened upon an envelope. I know the suspense is killing you, right? Well Panisa opened the envelope and inside as an old lottery ticket. He bought it almost a year ago and completely forgot about it. Panisa remembered reports that there was an unclaimed ticket, but what were the odds? Well, they were in his favor. He quickly checked the numbers and then claimed his $1 million prize — just eight days before it expired.

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