National Conference of Christians and Jews : "To bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance"

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Theme of Conference: "To bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance,"
170th Anniversary of George Washington's letter to the Hebrew Congregation of Newport, Rhode Island where he wrote the phrase "To bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance."

Speakers include: Morris Morgenstern, General Carlos Romulo, Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, New York States Attorney General Louis, J. Lefkowitz, Supreme Court Justice John E. Cone, and Congressman Emanuel Cellar.

Morgenstern notes "If we allow religious divisive to destroy our national unity only the Communists will win and all Americans will lose."

He goes on to discuss the prejudice that has recently arisen against the Catholic Church, and notes that that "it is a curious fact that prejudice is indivisible; the flood of anti-Catholic hate literature currently being circulated in all parts of the country comes from the same sources which at other times have attacked the Negro and the Jew. Tomorrow it will be some other group."

General Carlos Romulo speaks, he states that the American people are in a "life and death struggle against communism." Moral prejudices of yesteryear must undergo a radical revamping. He speaks of the courage of the United States forefathers who proclaimed "all men are created equal."

Eleanor Roosevelt speaks about the importance of religious freedom, which will determine the future of all men kind.

New York States Attorney General Louis, J. Lefkowitz reads a message from Vice-President Nixon.

Supreme Court Justice John E. Cone also reflects on the importance of George Washington's letter.

This event is co-sponsored by the National Conference of Christians and Jews and the Morris Morgenstern Foundation. Mr. Morgenstern speaks, telling a story of persecution of 40,000 Jewish students.



Audio courtesy of the NYC Municipal Archives WNYC Collection


WNYC archives id: 72711
Municipal archives id: LT9066