Streams

Measuring and Mapping Space

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Dr. Roberta Casagrande-Kim, guest curator, and Dr. Jennifer Chi, exhibitions director and chief curator, talk about the exhibition Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity, focused on ancient cartography and the ways in which Greek and Roman societies perceived and represented both the known and unknown worlds. It’s on view at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University through January 5, 2014.

Battista Agnese, Portolano. Folios 15 verso–16 recto, Land Map of Palestine Manuscript, Venice ca. 1552.

Spencer Collection, The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations: Spencer MS005.
From Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity, at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University through January 5, 2014.

 

Oronce Fine, De Mundi Sphaera. Folio 8 verso, Diagram of the Sun and the Planets Manuscript, France 1549.

Courtesy of Houghton Library, Harvard University: MS Typ 57
From Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity, at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University through January 5, 2014.

Ptolemy, Geographia. Folios 56 verso–57 recto (Part II, pages 2 and 3), World Map Manuscript, Florence ca. 1460.

Manuscripts and Archives Division, The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations: MA 097
From Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity, at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University through January 5, 2014.

Tabula Cebetis. The Path to Virtue Printed Book, Basel 1597.

Lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1944: 44.1.22
From Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity, at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University through January 5, 2014.

Beatus of Liebana, In Apocalypsin. M.429, Facsimile, Folios 31 verso–32 recto, Map of the World Facsimile of Manuscript, Toledo 1220.

The Morgan Library & Museum, New York: 175.4 N2 K64, Published in 2004
From Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity, at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University through January 5, 2014.

Aureus of Diocletian. Reverse: Emperor Holding a Globe and a Baton Gold Antioch 293–295 CE.

Courtesy of The American Numismatic Society: 1960.175.44.
From Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity, at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University through January 5, 2014.

Askos. Terracotta South Italy, third century BCE.

Lent by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Mrs. Frederic H. Betts, 1911: 11.43
From Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity, at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University through January 5, 2014.

Joannes de Sacro Bosco, De Sphaera Mundi. Folio 18 recto, Geocentric Diagram and Zodiac Symbols Manuscript, Austria 1425.

The Morgan Library & Museum, New York: MS M.722, Purchased in 1927
From Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity, at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University through January 5, 2014.

Guests:

Roberta Casagrande-Kim and Jennifer Chi
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Comments [2]

I find this collection to be truly fascinating. Will this collection be recreated in book form? As I am not able to visit NYC at this time.
What form were most map made? scrolls?

Oct. 16 2013 01:36 PM

Will the collection be recreated in book form?

Oct. 16 2013 01:32 PM

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