Streams

Martha Stewart Takes the Cake

Friday, October 18, 2013

Martha Stewart shares her expertise on baking cakes! Her new recipe book, Cakes, includes classics like German Chocolate, New York-Style Cheesecake, crowd pleasers like Baked Alaska, and cakes with unique, sophisticated flavors and embellishments.

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Martha Stewart
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Comments [9]

Peter Talbot from Harrison NJ

Martha was wonderful. So full of certitude regarding her aesthetic tastes, so willing to impart results of testing, but without the cloak of "magic" in the making. I couldn't help but think of her in the same light as ex-magicians that delight in revealing the methods of trickery to rubes. Listening to her I felt guilty delight. Nothing puts her off-stride. It's as if the world itself were incidental to her project, even if that project is promotional gourmandizing.

Oct. 21 2013 01:37 PM
Jerry from NY

I agree with you Cathleen. She is clearly misinformed regarding this subject.

Oct. 18 2013 08:54 PM
Cathleen from Manhattan

Dear Martha, and all Foodie Friday listeners: contrary to Martha's report today, all the national brands of flour make widely available unbleached all-purpose flours. THe difference between brands such as Gold Medal, Pillsbury, Heckers, and King Arthur, is in the protein content that you can expect. The point of having a big-brand flour is that you can count on consistency in their protein levels from year to year, due to the blending that big companies can do (vs small mills); this obviously helps your recipes to work reliably. King Arthur's all-purpose flour, generally speaking, has a meaningfully higher protein content than Gold Medal or Pillsbury all-purpose flours. This is not necessarily better quality (although it produces a prized result in yeast-bread baking); and in fact for many cakes and biscuits and pie crusts, you might prefer to be on the lower end of protein in your flour.

The bleaching may or may not be desired, it really depends on the kind of texture that you're looking for in your final product, the kind of wheat used to make the flour, and whether you need the flour to be strong enough to support heavy added ingredients (like a lot of fat and sugar) while remaining risen and tender. I don't know why Martha has suggested that bleached flours are to be avoided, nor why she seems to think that Gold Medal and Pillsbury are for bleached flours only; but this is misguided and not really a useful way to understand your flour options.

Oct. 18 2013 01:13 PM
Mary from Manhattan

I am entering a pie contest this weekend and I was so pleased to have been listening to WNYC this morning as I started baking my pie and be pleasantly surprised when Martha Stewart started speaking and sharing all her good baking tips!!! I can't wait to get her book on cakes and try 00 flour. In fact, once traveling in northern Italy, I had this very delicious dinner and the desert was just out of this world, it must have had 00 flour.

Oct. 18 2013 12:44 PM
Dani

Any advice on making a gluten free angel food cake?

Oct. 18 2013 12:25 PM
Amy from Manhattan

It's not hard to level flour in a cup for liquids--just jiggle it a little & it'll even out at the top. I just need to remember to measure all the dry ingredients before the liquid ones if I'm using the same cup....

Oct. 18 2013 12:25 PM
Ronald Kluck

Should we use a convection oven to bake a cake? Sto lot.

Oct. 18 2013 12:20 PM
Lena from Brooklyn

To prevent cracks in cheesecake for us plebians who don't have whatever expensive fancy stove Martha uses: place a small pan of water in your oven before preheating. It creates a moist atmosphere that prevents the outside of the cake from drying out too quickly. Good for baking bread too if you tend to end up with too-hard crusts.

Oct. 18 2013 12:16 PM
Tom from UWS

Share with Martha and Leonard this favorite quote from Julia Child:

"A party without cake is just a meeting."

Oct. 18 2013 12:08 PM

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