Streams

John V. Lindsay

Sunday, June 08, 1958

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Lindsay, Republican nominee for Congress of 17th Congressional district, answers questions about the silk stocking district (the 17th).

Marvin Sleeper moderates.

Panelists: Jim Farrell, Stan Siegel, and Peter Franklin.

Questions:

The 17th Congressional district will not vote Democratic this year.

When he announced his candidacy for the district, the incumbent dropped out of the race.

Influence of Eisenhower on today's Republican politicians.

He is close friends with his opponents, which doesn't have to be part of the race. If the Republican Party is going to build its strength in the Congressional district, a new approach is essential.

The line between Eisenhower Republican and Republican is fine, but he certainly considers himself an Eisenhower man. The only criticism he has of the administration is there is sometimes a lack of follow through.

Civil liberties, foreign policy and recession cures: He has formally registered his discontent with the General Butler bill. It is designed to clip the wings of the Supreme Court in certain areas of conflict. It's a shame that Democrats and some Republicans had gotten together in favor of that legislation. Judiciary must maintain its integrity as the last stronghold of civil liberties and rights. Every case involves an individual and a problem with him. In each case, it comes down to due process of law.

Supports Secretary Anderson whole-heartedly, specifically extension of unemployment benefits and acceleration of certain necessary Federal projects. Resisted the use of tax cuts to avoid a future deficit. A deficit as such is not bad inherently; households aren't run entirely on a balanced budget. Our commitments abroad and for defense are substantial, so it is incumbent upon us to think twice before taking such a drastic step. Rockefeller report merits serious study, and we should investigate our tax laws.

Eisenhower foreign aid program was a balanced and carefully thought out piece of legislation. Mutual aid is the best investment that we can make. Eisenhower correctly points out that a substantial portion is returned to us. It is a must program.

There is no reason for Republicans to start lying down.

Upwards of 200 people circulating petitions for him to get on the ballot. His supporters are professional people in the community. No leadership support at the time of his candidacy announcement.

Adam Clayton Powell is a long standing Democrat. The Republican Party should not be so cynical as to have to reach out to the opposition party, particularly when the two party system must be upheld in this city. Powell had made an issue out of racism, for which he was criticized by the NAACP.


Audio courtesy of the NYC Municipal Archives WNYC Collection


WNYC archives id: 72274
Municipal archives id: LT8220

Contributors:

Jim Farrell, Peter Franklin, John V. Lindsay, Stan Siegel and Marvin Sleeper

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