Streams

It's Contract Time

Thursday, May 08, 2014

Mayor Bill de Blasio, UFT President Michael Mulgrew and Schools Chancellor Carmen Farina announce a preliminary 9-year contract on May 1, 2014. (Rob Bennett/Office of Mayor Bill de Blasio)

Late last week Mayor de Blasio announced several new municipal workers contracts, including a big new deal with the United Federation of Teachers. Richard Steier, editor and columnist for the Chief-Leader and author of Enough Blame to Go Around: The Labor Pains of New York City's Public Employee Unions, discusses the politics and policy of the contract -- and what it means for other unions.

Guests:

Richard Steier

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Comments [10]

Paula Thesing

The ATRs who are on the higher salary levels will be discriminated against with this new contract. If you can hire two new teachers for the price of one, why would a principal choose the more expensive one? This means good long time teachers who have been excessed from failing schools have a particularly hard time finding a new position. Frequently they are told they do not have a specific skill like speaking Japanese. These people are close to retirement and need to be protected. The system could at least offer them a buy out so they can retire without penalties.

May. 08 2014 02:32 PM
lisa altomare from beacon

everyone knows principals have been doing everything they can to get rid of teachers who are older and are in the top tier of pay!! you can get 2 teachers for the price of one!my husband was a brilliant teacher of over 20 years at JFK HS in the bronx, and was hounded out along with his peers-had never gotten a "U"-students adored him, all the other history teachers called him the professor-he was a fabulous instructor-all of a sudden after 20 years , a gym teacher who was the new AP-gave him a U-and it continued. the principal the DOE got in was nicknamed "the closer"-her job was to hound out as many high salary teachers as she could. one teacher had a heart attack and died. its a disgrace-becoming an ATR after years of being at the top of your game-the teachers are not incompetent, who are ATRS-its disgraceful. what they want now are test score preparers-the teachers of our youth are long gone and have been kicked out

May. 08 2014 10:51 AM
Amy from Manhattan

It's ridiculous that teachers haven't had a raise in so long. Strange how it's the politicians who say they'll run gov't. like a business don't give their employees raises for years. An actual business wouldn't withhold pay increases.

May. 08 2014 10:51 AM
Sammy

Dave, I don't believe requiring services requires unionization. Most other businesses and countries work quite well without the danger of massive bankruptcy or high inefficiency of tax dollar spending. One could take a job and agree to a pay level and work their way up the chain or decide to move on if they feel they are worth more.

May. 08 2014 10:43 AM
antonio from baySide

Is the $1000 signing bonus taxed?

May. 08 2014 10:41 AM
Dave From NorthEast Bronx

@ Bruce from Mahattan,
We got in this situation when city folks started to demand services from municipal governments. Someone has to perform these services.
Everyone complains when the snow doesn't get cleared from their street one minutes after it falls or the garbage stinks infrom of their building, but noone wants to pay for it.
Oh well, we can always go back to the 1890s when people burned their own garbage and get their water from the Hudson River.
Those were the good old days!!!

May. 08 2014 10:37 AM
David from nyc

While most firms are looking to limit FTE.

This is still a great ride.
On my dollar.

Teachers work what 6 hours a day and summers off ??

Take the deal , they would never have gotten this from Bloomberg

May. 08 2014 10:37 AM

Retro pay has been an interest free loan to the city from city workers for years.

Anyone know the value of this gift?

May. 08 2014 10:34 AM
Bruce from Manhattan

How did we get into this perverse situation where municipal workers need to unionize against their fellow tax payers? I can understand the need with to unionize around private business or factories. This system we have now has created our current dilemma, where a labor union works with politicians who pander for votes and support with the very groups they are supposed to be negotiating in good faith for the tax payer with. There is very little control as it's "other people's money" at play. Look around the country - it isn't working.

It also creates a situation (which again we are seeing around the country) where costs rise astronomically, because unlike a company which when it becomes uncompetitive goes out of business, local governments can always raise taxes on it's people under implied force, at least until they had enough and move.

Oh well, I'm not expecting anything to change anytime soon.

May. 08 2014 10:10 AM
Pedro M

hold on to your wallets, folks!

May. 08 2014 10:02 AM

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