Streams

How Poverty Affects Mental Health

Monday, March 31, 2014

For the first part of this week’s installment of our series Strapped: A Look at Poverty in America, we’re finding out how poverty affects mental health. Epidemiologist Dr. Jane Costello examines the impact poverty has on mental health, especially among children. She tells us about her Great Smoky Mountains Study—a longitudinal study of more than 1,400 children in North Carolina—looking at who gets mental illness, who gets treatment, and how rising out of poverty improves the mental health of children and families. Dr. Costello is Associate Director for Research, Center for Child & Family Policy and Professor of Medical Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University.

Guests:

Jane Costello

Comments [4]

Wayne Johnson Ph.D. from Bk

If you come down on the side of the issue that claims mental illness causes poverty, you tend to give an intentionally unequal society where the rich are getting richer at the expense of the poor, a free pass.

Mar. 31 2014 04:49 PM
jf from the united mass suicidal corporations of america

there were many other studies that had more answers: https://decorrespondent.nl/541/why-we-should-give-free-money-to-everyone/31639050894-e44e2c00

Mar. 31 2014 01:39 PM
The Truth from Becky

I know it affects your behaviour.

Mar. 31 2014 01:21 PM
jgarbuz from Queens

By definition, "rising out of poverty" means acceptance into society as a whole, because to rise out of poverty means someone has offered a job with a salary that enables existence above subsistence level. At one time, rising out of poverty meant having a patch of land you can grow an adequate amount of food on. Or having an area you could hunt an adequate amount of game on.

However, today rising out of poverty usually means having a job. And having a job means acceptance to a certain extent rather than facing constant rejection. Those who face constant rejection and negative feedback, for whatever reasons, are more prone to depression and other mentally desturbing conditions.

Mar. 31 2014 01:07 PM

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