Streams

Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio

Saturday, February 15th at 6AM on 93.9 FM and Sunday, February 16th at 7AM and 8PM on AM 820

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Saturday, February 15, 2014

Starting in the 1950s, Black radio stations around the country became the pulse of African-American communities, and served as their megaphone during the Civil Rights and Black Power movements. Going Black examines the legacy of Black radio, with a special focus on the legendary WDAS in Philadelphia. The story of Black radio in Philadelphia is actually the story of a musical era that would have gone undiscovered, of Civil Rights and progress in the African-American community, and of how the radio medium has changed in the last century. Hosted by legendary Sound of Philadelphia music producer and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Kenny Gamble. 

Today, a lot of people don't know what the term "Black radio" means. But starting in the 1950s, Black radio stations around the country became the pulse of African-American communities, and served as their megaphone during the Civil Rights and Black Power movements. Stations like WDAS in Philly, WDIA in Memphis, WWRL and WBLS in NYC, WHUR and WOL in DC, WERD in Atlanta, WVON in Chicago, WLAC in Nashville, WMRY in New Orleans and KWBR in San Francisco featured radio personalities with styles all their own who played records you'd never get to hear on mainstream radio. Beyond being hip radio stations, these were pipelines into the Black community where you'd get the latest news on current events and the Civil Rights Movement — at a time when the mainstream media wasn't covering these stories from a Black perspective.

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