Streams

Gambling on the Ballot

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Casino chips (Jam Adams/flickr)

Gerald Benjamin, associate vice president for regional engagement and director of the Center for Research, Regional Education and Outreach (CRREO) at SUNY New Paltz and the author of The Oxford Handbook of New York State Government and Politics, discusses the gambling referendum on the November ballot to allow seven casinos in New York State.

Guests:

Gerald Benjamin

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Comments [11]

Donald J. Sepanek from Bayonne, NJ

Brian, you're argument that because people are addicted to alcohol, it's okay for them to become addicted to gambling is weak. You can use that argument to legalize almost anything that's addictive. What's next? Meth? Heroin?

Oct. 23 2013 02:07 PM
mike on long island from long island

i agree with both jgarbuz( maybe for the first time) and ron. legalized gambling is regressive, and will cause many more problems for the people it will hurt, than the people it will help( with jobs). it will also hurt the majority people, who dont particpate at all, either by not gambling, or not being employed in the industry. their tax money will be used to try to undo all the social damage gambling brings. also, ron is correct. when the politicians say all the money will go to a certain area, it does. what they dont tell you is the defund the money that was already going there, and use it elsewhere. its a shell game. as far as gambling, lets look at quick draw. its a video gambling terminal , with a new game every twenty minutes. msny of these units are in bars, where its guaranteed that many of the participants will be impaired by alcohol. the state is basically in the business of the old days practice of " rolling drunks" . that full sized legalized gambling will be much worse.

Oct. 23 2013 10:52 AM
seth

Ron is right. The net gain for schools is $0.

Oct. 23 2013 10:31 AM
Amy from Manhattan

The Voter Guide section on this ballot proposal says there's already a law that will authorize gambling at 4 new video lottery gaming facilities *if the proposal doesn't pass*. This puts voters in the position of voting for 1 kind of gambling or another in NY State rather than for or against gambling, & I don't think that's clear enough. (I couldn't get on by phone to ask this.)

Oct. 23 2013 10:22 AM
Ron Fletcher from Yonkers

There is always the position that the taxes from gambling will go to the schools but I suspect what happens is that the politicians in Albany see this extra money to ed. and drop other funding so that effectively, the income is pushed elsewhere.

Oct. 23 2013 10:16 AM
John A from WC

I will be voting in this election specifically against the casinos. I expect to vote on no other issue this Nov.

Oct. 23 2013 10:16 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

Country is going to hell, and legalizing gambling in New York will only accelerate the inevitable. Too many poor people are being tempted and fleeced by high hopes. This is really a tax on the poor and the hopeless.

Oct. 23 2013 10:12 AM
Katie from Huntington

Sorry, that was "addictions!" : )

Oct. 23 2013 10:11 AM
Leslie from Brooklyn

Every time this sort of thing comes up I think of Jimmy Stewart running through Bedford Falls -- but it is now Pottersville. With all the garishness.

Atlantic City has not reaped great benefits from its gambling.

Oct. 23 2013 10:11 AM
Katie Kennedy from Huntington, NY

I couldn't care less about other people's additions. My objection is to the element gambling attracts. All one has to do is to go to the beautiful, glitzy hotels in Atlantic City. Nice, if you like that sort of thing. But don't dare walk on the Boardwalk for a romantic evening. It's hard to be romantic when you have drug deals going on right around you--worse, to be approached by that element. Notice the people who go elsewhere to gamble, and spend their money, come back home to their nice safe environments here in NY. No one would want to LIVE there!!!

Oct. 23 2013 10:09 AM
mbk from manhattan

We have bars, so why not casinos? maybe they should just device some sort of limit system to the time any individual can stay in a casino.

Oct. 23 2013 10:07 AM

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